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by PopMatters Staff

8 Nov 2010


Attention 30 Rock geeks, and we know there are a lot of you, Relativity Media is unleashing a double CD set of musical 30 Rock moments next week and here we have Sarah Palin… oops Tina Fey teaming with ‘70s pop star Christopher Cross (remember “Sailing”?, hopefully not).

by J.M. Suarez

8 Nov 2010


The Decemberists have just released information on their follow-up to 2009’s excellent The Hazards of Love.  Their new album, The King Is Dead is set for a January 18, 2011 release and it features guest appearances by Peter Buck and Gillian Welch on several of the songs.

 

SONG LIST
01 Don’t Carry It All
02 Calamity Song
03 Rise to Me
04 Rox in the Box
05 January Hymn
06 Down by the Water
07 All Arise!
08 June Hymn
09 This Is Why We Fight
10 Dear Avery

You can access a link to a free download of “Down by the Water” (featuring both Buck and Welch) by going to the band’s website.

by Stephen Rowland

5 Nov 2010


Of all the films made between the years of 1893 and 1930 in the United States, less than 20% are said to still exist, according to the Library of Congress, which is a crushing blow to any cineaste. Personally, I don’t even like to think about it. This isn’t just due to wastefulness; early celluloid film containing nitrate or acetate deteriorated rapidly over the years if not properly preserved, not to mention such film is highly flammable. American studios distributed many of their films around the world, and while there were many that the U.S. didn’t hold on to, other countries did.

by PopMatters Staff

5 Nov 2010


“This is what I love about Republicans. I honestly secretly really admire them because, man they have guts. They come in with both guns blazing. They take no prisoners. What I suggested to you here that played on last night’s show, about how there’s 420 bills that the House has already passed, that the Senate could pass right now because we have enough votes to do that, yet they won’t do it—I know they won’t do it—even simple bills like the child nutrition bill, they won’t do it. But I’ll tell you what, if the shoe was on the other foot, if this was the Republicans in a lame duck session, dammit, they’d be passing as much of that as they could. Because that’s how they are. Because they believe in something. And that’s what Americans love about republicans. Because they just believe in something.”—Michael Moore

by Eric Allen Been

4 Nov 2010


It was 40 years ago today that David Bowie arguably invented glam rock with the U.S. release of his third studio album The Man Who Sold the World. While the dominant storyline usually contends that glam’s genesis began with Marc Bolan’s glitter and satin-wearing appearance on the British broadcast Top of the Pops in March 1971, Bowie nonetheless predated T. Rex’s performance that mixed raunchy guitars with androgyny by addressing sexual uncertainty over hard rock riffs on the Sold the World’s opener “The Width of a Circle”.

What’s more, Bowie’s first iconoclastic challenges to the alpha male rock star stereotype continued during the Sold the World era with him donning a dress during the album’s U.S. promotional tour, and he later showed up wearing the same garb on the album cover for the 1971 UK release of the project. 

But the Sold the World metamorphosis wasn’t just a stylistic change up but a musical diversion as well. Bowie abandoned his psychedelic folk-leaning roots on the release, teaming up with the virtuosic Mick Ronson (who later formed the backbone of the Bowie’s Spiders from Mars band) to concoct an album that leaned towards the proto-metal electric heaviness of then contemporaries Black Sabbath and Led Zeppelin.

Though Sold the World is now often overshadowed by Bowie’s commercial breakthrough Hunky Dory and the glorious run that is the Ziggy Stardust albums, the 1970 release is when Bowie’s strange odyssey really began. And when he became truly great.

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