Latest Blog Posts

by J.C. Sciaccotta

18 Jan 2011

Go Satomi’s, go! Filmed in Tokyo and directed by Noriko Oishi, “Super Duper Rescue Heads!” is the first video from Deerhoof’s upcoming release, Deerhoof vs. Evil (out January 25 in the US via Polyvinyl and the day before on ATP in the UK). The video begins relatively low-key, with Satomi buying some snacks before kicking back to watch some tube. Things take a psychedelic left turn from there, however, with a glammed-up Satomi busting out some rad moves in the midst of a projection light show freak-out. Cool.

In other news, the band will begin a tour in support of the record on January 27 in Sacramento, California. Seemingly intent on fighting evil on a global scale, the band will take their act worldwide, paying visits to France and nearly all of Scandinavia before perfoming their Milk Man LP (!) in its entirety at Alexandra Palace in London.

by Jessy Krupa

18 Jan 2011

Comedy Central airs the 200th episode of South Park, which causes controversy for a recurring character on the show, the Prophet Mohammed.


by John Garratt

18 Jan 2011

British guitarist Adrian Legg released his last album Inheritance in the fall of 2004. It was a lovely mash-up of ambient blues, shuffles, jigs and waltzes treated with ornamental guitar effects thereby stretching the bounds of what it means to enjoy an instrumental solo guitar album.

Then for a while, that was it. Legg continued to tour but updates that divulged a possible follow-up album were few and far between. Leggheads everywhere can rest easy now for Adrian has finally unleashed Slow Guitar, a self-released affair featuring 13 tracks. All of them appear to be rerecorded versions of songs from Legg’s back catalog (though I must be missing the album that originally contained “Karen”). And seeing as how Adrian Legg’s effects pedal board had been growing over the years, jiggering his sound beyond the confines of a simple electric-acoustic guitar, these reinterpretations stand to go a long way. I myself look forward to hearing another rendition of the note-perfect piece “Mrs. Jack’s Last Stand”.

Here he shares the process of laying out the artwork with his Facebook friends.

by Subashini Navaratnam

17 Jan 2011

Usually, Kuala Lumpur is predictably sweltering and humid with the occasional rainstorm to break the monotony. Over Christmas and New Year, however, we had grey skies, rain, and a strange new chill in the air brought on by a slight dip in temperatures. It seemed only prudent to hunker down to some hard work and the ‘80s-era TV adaptations of Dorothy L. Sayers’ mystery novels available on YouTube. Particularly, Gaudy Night, which I enjoyed in book-form and also in its visual adaptation. Edward Petherbridge hits all the right notes as the impossibly fair-haired and monocled Lord Peter Wimsey, prone to yes, whimsy and English excess, and capable of being endearing, compelling, and annoying all at once. Harriet Walters also plays Harriet Vane just as I imagined Harriet Vane to be: intelligent, also mildly annoying, and seething with an undercurrent of anger and proper English passion.

The cloistered all-female colleges of Oxford provide opportunities for plenty of scholarly women to wax lyrical over Socrates, morality, and human nature. There are stereotypical assumptions on female intelligence and sexuality, as well as the unpleasant whiff of distinct class snobbery – the latter being a common trait in Sayers’ novels and British mysteries of the particular era. However, the performances of the actors manage to inject nuance into what is “just” a mystery story (albeit a very compelling one). Furthermore, in the midst of 21st century bad weather and general disenchantment with the new year, the utterly inexplicable and anachronistic yet very apt romance between Peter Wimsey and Harriet Vane allow our jaded but still quietly-romantic hearts to keep on beating in hope for our real-life infatuations.

by Jessy Krupa

14 Jan 2011

M.I.A’s controversial music video for “Born Free” is released. In the clip, violence against red-haired people is used as a metaphor for racist hatred throughout the world.

//Mixed media

How Röyksopp's 'Melody A.M.' Brought Electronica Into the Mainstream

// Sound Affects

"With their debut, the Norwegian duo essentially provided the everyman's guide to electronic music.

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