Latest Blog Posts

by Adrien Begrand

22 Jul 2015


Led by singer/clarinetist/washboard player Jess Eliot Myhre and guitarist Chris Ousley, Baltimore’s Bumper Jacksons evoke a bygone era of American music, integrating early jazz, bluegrass, blues, swing, and folk into a raucous, all-inclusive hybrid that sounds as loud and energetic as it had to have sounded decades and decades ago. Their latest album Too Big World comes out this week, and the gritty cover of the old American gospel song “Satan, Your Kingdom Must Come Down” is a great indication of what to expect.

by Adrien Begrand

22 Jul 2015

Photo by
Amy Peterson

Seattle sludge/doom trio Serial Hawk are set to release their debut full-length Searching For Light in a couple months, and as you can hear on the nine-minute track “Desolate’, it’s the sort of relentless yet hypnotic form of heavy music in the great tradition of Neurosis. Power and contemplation melded into one colossal whole, a track that swings as much as it stomps.

by Adrien Begrand

22 Jul 2015


After an extended stint as back-up singer on Miley Cyrus’s recent world tour, Nashville singer-songwriter Dani Elliott has kickstarted her solo career with her debut EP The Best Part. A part of the new generation of Nashville artists who venture well beyond the parameters of mainstream country while still acknowledging their heritage, Elliott’s music is contemporary and old-fashioned at the same time, which is nicely on display on the shimmering new single “Sinner”. Adorned with chillwave synths and a strong R&B influence, there’s still that rustic, Southern influence underneath it all. Featuring Elliott’s sumptuous vocal work, “Sinner” has great crossover appeal, and deserves to be heard.

by Cynthia Fuchs

21 Jul 2015


“The United States is where most drugs are sold.” The Mexican meth cooker is working at night, his face covered by a bandana, protection against both smoke and any sort of identification. “We know we do harm with all the drugs that go there,” he goes on as you watch one of his colleagues stir a huge blue vat and another documents amounts with a cell phone camera. Their arms and hands swirl in smoke, rising as if from a witches’ brew, “But what are we going to do? We come from poverty. If we were doing well, we would be like you, traveling the world or doing good clean jobs like you guys.”

by Eric Risch

21 Jul 2015


Hailing from Huntington, West Virginia, the six-piece band Ona makes pure-blooded American rock and roll. Set to release their debut LP, American Fiction, via Twin Cousins Records on 25 September, “Rocks in the Basement”, the album’s lead single, picks up the path forged by The Other Side of June, the band’s 2014 two-song cassette. Named after an unincorporated West Virginia town best known for its racetrack and airfield, Ona conveys the insatiable urge to discover the larger world that resides along the east-west running Route 60.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

'Five Came Back' Is an Unusual and Seminal Suspenser

// Short Ends and Leader

"This film feels like a template for subsequent multi-character airplane-disaster and crash projects, all the way down to Lost.

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