Latest Blog Posts

by Allison Taich

3 Dec 2009


Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers are one of those bands that continues to release greatness with age. Their latest issuance: an anthology of live performances spanning the last 30 years. This collection is by no means a greatest hits. Naturally, classics such as “American Girl”, “Mary Jane’s Last Dance”, and “Free Fallin’” make appearances, in addition to deeper cuts like “Breakdown”, “Wildflowers”, and “It’s Good to be King.” Several covers also appear on the set, including “Green Onions” by Booker T. and the MGs and “Friend of the Devil” by the Grateful Dead.

by Tyler Gould

3 Dec 2009


Matthew Friedberger does a great Dennis Hopper in this video for the Fiery Furnaces’ “Even in the Rain”, which is basically an annotated video version of the making of Easy Rider. The benign track comes from I’m Going Away, and check after the jump to see some dates for their intercontinental tour.

by Chris Conaton

3 Dec 2009


1. The Lonely Island - “I’m on a Boat”


by Tyler Gould

2 Dec 2009


This Marina is a slippery character. On the one hand, the anti-consumerism invective of “Hollywood” is a tad on the puerile side, but the ironic pageant queen smile, the oversaturated disdain for the red, white, and blue, and the punchy chorus all make schadenfreude cool again.

by Chadwick Jenkins

2 Dec 2009


Perhaps no band has had a greater impact upon the history of recorded music than the Beatles. The studio wizard George Martin claims that he liked the energy the young four musicians had when he began recording them in 1962 but he never imagined that they had musical ability or the creativity to sustain a long career. His opinion, needless to say, shifted radically over the course of their working relationship. Together, the Beatles and George Martin would produce one of the greatest collections of studio recordings of popular music.

The Beatles on Record, a new documentary on the History Channel, tracks the Fab Four through their recordings. The film is a marvel of editing. It includes filmed footage, enlivens still photographs by giving them a virtual three-dimensional feel, and uses only the voices of the Beatles themselves along with their producer and studio collaborator George Martin as narrators. Obviously the producers of this documentary lavished considerable attention to culling from the various recorded interviews with John, Paul, Ringo, George, and George to find pertinent commentary on each of the record releases. Bob Smeaton, the man behind the Beatles Anthology series, is at the helm here and his attention to detail and his stylish use of archival material creates a truly admirable piece of work.

Those who know something about the recording history of the group may not learn a lot of new information here but the presentation makes for enjoyable viewing nonetheless. Besides, who could ask for better music?

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Violin Virtuoso L. Subramaniam Mesmerizes in Rare New York Performance (Photos)

// Notes from the Road

"Co-presented by the World Music Institute, the 92Y hosted a rare and mesmerizing performance from India's violin virtuoso L. Subramaniam.

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