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by Katharine Wray

8 Sep 2009


Wild Beasts sound like tree nymph monks. Their sunny new video for the single “All the King’s Men” displays a curiously catchy song with chanting. Worth a gander.

by Ashley Cooper

7 Sep 2009


In 1983, Mark Rosman sat in the director’s chair of an extremely low-budget horror film, The House on Sorority Row. Filmed on a shoestring budget of $425,000, the movie flopped when it was originally released on January 21 of that year. However, a month later, the film found a place in the heart of fans of the slasher film genre, and had generated over $4 million in box office revenue.

More than 20 years later, the film is being recreated for horror lovers. Paying homage to Rosman by naming the university after him, the movie has a similar premise to the 1983 version. Six sorority sisters decide to get revenge on one of their cheating boyfriends by faking the death of one of their own. In doing so, the prank goes horribly wrong as the person is actually killed. The survivors decide to hide the body and never speak of that night again. Eight months later, someone has found proof of their misdeed and begins to stalk them with the evidence, killing them off one by one. The group, which gets smaller and smaller, must band together to find out who the perpetrator of these crimes might be, as well as fight for their right to stay alive.

by Ashley Cooper

6 Sep 2009


American funk/soul band, the Commodores, are releasing a new album of all of their hits. The band, established in 1974 when they all met as freshman at Tuskegee University (then known as Tuskegee Institute). They signed with Motown in November 1972, having gained public interest by opening for the Jackson 5 while they were on tour. They have sold over 70 million records worldwide.

Known for the ballads, “Easy” and “Three Times a Lady”, both of which are on the remastered cd, the group is known for their dance and feel good records. Fans of their music can tell you that the Commodores was the launching pad for the career of Lionel Richie, but also can tell you that the soul/funk vibe of the group is missing from the current music scene, which is why it is so appropriate that the group remaster their hits, allowing their old fans to enjoy the music in quality form, and even attract some newer fans.

While the group has not recorded new material in over ten years, they are very active in performing in venues all across the world and selling out concert halls. They tour with other groups, and headline shows in such venues as Trump Casinos and Hard Rock Casinos.

by Ashley Cooper

6 Sep 2009


Only Built 4 Cuban Linx… Pt. II will be the fourth solo album from Wu-Tang Clan member Raekwon. It is the anticipated sequel to the 1995 album, Only Built 4 Cuban Linx and will be released on September 8th, 2009.

The album was initially announced in 2005, and was completed in 2006. It was not released as of 2007, and was named the “#6 Most Anticipated Album of 2007” by XXL Magazine. Despite all the hype surrounding it, the album kept getting pushed back and release date changes were made. Due to a new contract Raekwon signed with Dr. Dre’s record label, Aftermath Entertainment, distribution concerns also impeded the album’s release to the public. Despite all the fuss and concern, the album was revamped and is now finally set for release.

The first single “New Wu” (originally named “Wu Ooh”), has been getting playback on New York station Hot 97, and the video, which can be seen below, was released exclusively online. The album features all of Wu-Tang Clan except for U-God, and also Cappadonna, Poppa Wu, Blue Raspberry and Suga Bang Bang. Other guests also Busta Rhymes, Styles P., Jadakiss and R&B singer Lyfe Jennings.

by Eleanore Catolico

4 Sep 2009


Club kid ilk everywhere put on those jukin’ shoes because Simian Mobile Disco just announced their US tour dates (after the jump) in the fall to promote their second studio album Temporary Pleausure out now on Wichita Recordings. This is a follow up to 2007’s Attack Decay Sustain Release. Producers Jas Shaw and James Ford of SMD recruited a pantheon of indie stars including Alexis Taylor of Hot Chip, Telepathe, and Chris Keating of Yeasayer giving vocals to Temporary Pleasure‘s first single, “Audacity of Huge”. Recorded in the band’s East London studio, Temporary Pleasure is an album filled with minimalist house beats and robotic vocal distortion of imperative lore. Unlike the heavy-hitting pump up the volume, pump up the volume, dance! of Justice or the Bloody Beetroots, TP stealthily slithers into your cerebrum. 

The band recently forayed into the avant-garde fusion of technology and aesthetics called “augmented reality” or AR. Conceived by Kate Moross and produced by MagicSymbol, an installation celebrating the release of Temporary Pleasure featured a mixture of both real life and computer generated images all within the SMD cosmos, creating the illusion that virtual things thrive in the corporeal realm.  It’s that art imitating life or life imitating art shtick. Those clever synth-cats.

This ambitious, visual evolution for SMD would translate impeccably to their live show, seizure-inducing lightning fest and all. Pyrotechnics aside, SMD live if done the AR way could be a new kind of ecstatic chaos for the concert-going experience, minus the need of drugs. SMD have already expanded their alignment with the AR endimanche’, by having Kate Moross also direct their music video for “Audacity of Huge”.

As an extension of SMD’s said affinities, “Audacity of Huge” is abound with striking, juxtaposed tableaus of things you’d find off the cover of your old EyeWitness books and convex close ups that make you ask, “What is this, really? or “How does it relate to anything?”, reminiscent of Conan O’Brien’s old Late Night skit “Patterns” where we see a few incongruous pictures, only for them to be united by a more-often-than-not grotesque punch line. Nothing super yucky here, thankfully. There’s also a lot of viscous liquids. Honey? Maple syrup? Maybe molasses? Look out for the boys of SMD at the end of the video making a cameo appearance in what appears to be a limited edition set of UNO cards. I guess that illusionary motif finally comes full circle, huh? Still pretty cool though. Be sure to catch SMD kick off their tour of the States on October 28th in Boston, but for now here’s the video for “Audacity of Huge” and a trippy visual performance of “Synthesise”, full of flashy geometrics:

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