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by Allison Taich

4 Feb 2011


February 15, 2011 marks the recording debut of Yellowbirds, the first “solo” effort by singer/songwriter/multi-instrumentalist Sam Cohen (Apollo Sunshine). With help from some friends Cohen orchestrated a sonic dreamland of billowing melodies, lulling harmonies and illustrative existential reasoning. Yellowbirds’ dreamland, appropriately titled The Color, was inspired by Cohen’s nostalgia for his Texas roots, crossed with contemporary industrial wonders of his current home New York City. In turn The Color is a collage of cool, calm and collected psychedelic folk rock, paired with dream pop and varnished with a southern croon; listening to Yellowbirds is like riding on a rainbow wondering “what’s next?” Stray away from the ordinary and join Yellowbirds in their “quixotic world where only the purist tones can be heard.”

The band is scheduled to perform February 12, 2011 at Cake Shop in NYC. Fingers crossed that more dates get announced in the near future.

by PopMatters Staff

4 Feb 2011


Following the release of this week’s Rolling Blackouts, the Go! Team want you to know their story and they’ve just put out a new mini documentary to tell it. Check out our review of the new album after you watch all about the history of the band and their artistic approach.

by Jessy Krupa

3 Feb 2011


Among the new album releases this month are Mojo by Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers, Miss America by Saving Abel, Shout It Out by Hanson, Tried & True by Clay Aiken, Time Flies… 1994-2009 by Oasis, Suddenly by Allstar Weekend, Up on the Ridge by Dierks Bentley, Lazarus by Travie McCoy, Sweet and Wild by Jewel, Further by the Chemical Brothers,Thank Me Later by Drake, Bingo! by the Steve Miller Band, Body Talk Pt.1 by Robyn, To the Sky by Kevin Rudolf, I’m Alive, I’m Dreaming by the Ready Set, Laws of Illusion by Sarah McLachlan, Something for Everybody by Devo, Love King by the Dream, and the latest Top 40 hits compliation: Now 34

 

by Jane Jansen Seymour

3 Feb 2011


The Hundred in the Hands’ “Young Aren’t Young” has been getting airplay in the UK and U.S recently with an infectious swirl of synths. The song might not seem exactly new with the electro dance beat under dreamy female vocals, but it makes for an instant party atmosphere. These lush layers are actually minimally produced, as witnessed during a recent live session for WFUV’s The Alternative Side (TAS) program. Brooklynites Jason Friedman and Eleanore Everdell piece their music together using lots of electronic equipment, a low-fi bullet microphone and Friedman’s wicked electric guitar with a of bit background vocal help. In the accompanying interview, the duo explains the recognizable sound to crate digging for their vast vinyl collection. 

“You can’t not [have records],” Everdell explains, “when you love music.” They also espouse their love of music and current bands in a webzine called Thith Zine. For those wondering, the band’s name refers to a moment in American history when soldiers attacked a Lakota village in what is now Wyoming. Recording of both their EP released last spring, Dressed in Dresden, and their self-titled release issued in the fall, took place at during the same time frame. The TAS session also includes “Commotion”, “Lovesick Once Again”, and “Pigeons”. While the rest of the songs are similarly stylized, there’s nothing wrong with allowing such musical indulgence.

by Stephen Rowland

3 Feb 2011


The world needs more Orson Welles, and we just might get it. Though quite the Renaissance man, Welles’s directorial efforts always seemed to be struggles. Even after Citizen Kane began appearing on lists as the greatest film ever made, the debacles never seemed to end. Works such as Chimes at Midnight and The Deep are basically forgotten, Mr. Arkadin was slapped around and sort of released in several different cuts, whether on his own volition or not, he was uncredited for The Lady From Shanghai and Black Magic, and for crying out loud, his magnum opus The Magnificent Ambersons hasn’t even seen the light of day on DVD!

This is just not fair.

Now, filmed in 1972, locked in a vault, never completely finished or properly edited, The Other Side of the Wind will most likely be available in the near future. A film about a director by a director starring other directors (John Huston, Claude Chabrol, Peter Bogdonavich), as well as Dennis Hopper and Oja Kodar (Welles’s lover at the time), Other Side was never released due to legal problems involving producers who are now selling their interests in the film.

John Huston’s son, actor Danny Huston, has called the footage “fascinating”, but there is still debate among the film’s living collaborators as to whether it should be edited into cohesion, released raw, or released at all.

The likely outcome is that Bogdonavich, who received “extensive notes” regarding the editing during filming, will be putting it together. There is no information about a theatrical or DVD release, distribution, or rights at this time.

 

//Mixed media
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Here Comes the Bloom: Timothy Bloom Takes Hip-Hop to the Sock-Hop

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