Latest Blog Posts

by PopMatters Staff

26 Aug 2010


Earlier this summer K Records unveiled the innovative K Singles Zip-Pak, wherein subscribers receive new MP3 singles via e-mail each week for just $35.00 for a yearly subscription. In addition to new tunes from K artists, the series also includes “exclusive mixes, bonus songs and live documents”. In the end, subscribers wind up with hundreds of new tunes in a year that they couldn’t get anywhere else and all for a bargain price that goes straight to the artists and the label and cuts out the middleman.

Today we have the pleasure of offering PopMatters readers these two songs from Christmas that will be among the tunes mailed out to subscribers this evening. Olympia Washington’s Christmas formed out of a trip to Poland taken by Emily Beanblossom (vocals, keys) and Pat Scott-Walsh (guitar). Chatting in a bar there, they concocted their plan for a gritty, noise band with pop underpinnings. “Dog Problems” and “It’s Only an Ocean”, which features Calvin Johnson, will be appearing on a February 2011 7-inch single along with “Namiot” and a remix of “Namiot” by Johnson. If you like what you hear, check out the band at one of their upcoming dates (after the jump) and sign up for the Zip-Pack subscription.

[Subscribe to the K Singles Zip-Pak]

by PopMatters Staff

26 Aug 2010


British headline grabbers and punky poppers the Libertines kicked off their official reunion last night in London, playing a gig at the HMV Forum. The 21-song set featured all the expected favorites and the band has upcoming appearances at the Leeds Festival and Reading Festival on deck.

by Steve Horowitz

26 Aug 2010


The 1967 pop ditty, “C’mon Down to My Boat”, evokes sweetness and light. Every Mother’s Son seemed like good guys who just wanted to free a hard working girl from the clutches of her fisherman father. But lately, I’ve been wondering. The line, “Soon I’m gonna have to get my knife and cut that rope”—what does it really mean. The daughter is not literally tied to the dock. That would be too kinky. The more logical allusion is that the familial obligations keep the girl tied down. Therefore, what is Every Mother’s Son really gonna do with that knife? Do the lyrics suggest an act of violence? Does the sugary pop confection hide a darker meaning, and the singer is going to stab and kill the father so he can elope with the daughter? That may be reading too much into the lyrics, but the Summer of Love from which this song emerged soon turned into a more brutal era. Perhaps the clues were there all along, in innocent music like this.

by PopMatters Staff

25 Aug 2010


The Lovetones’ Matthew Tow has been playing in Brian Jonestown Massacre since 2003, all the while keeping his own band chugging through five albums. That fifth release is Lost, dropping 28 September on Planting Seeds Records. The group’s 2009 record, Dimensions, garnered an 8 from PopMatters, with Sarah Moore talking about how the Aussie band “brings a down-under haze to psychedelic pop mindful of the 1960s.” Lost features nine new tunes, including the opener “City Meets the Stars”, that continues to display the Lovetones’ love of psychedelic jangle pop rooted in the ‘60s and influenced by the Byrds, the Beatles and the Moody Blues.

by Peta Jinnath Andersen

25 Aug 2010


Earlier this month, award-winning author Neil Gaiman contributed a short story, to Harper Perennial’s recent Fifty-Two Stories experiment, Neil Gaiman contributed a short story, The Truth Is a Cave in the Black Mountains. Last week, he read the story for the first time at Australia’s Sydney Opera House. Here are a few highlights, via The Sydney Morning Herald.

Note: Contains spoilers.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Call For Papers: Celebrating Star Trek's 50th Anniversary

// Announcements

"To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the hit franchise, PopMatters seeks submissions about Star Trek, including: the TV series, from The Original Series (TOS) to the highly anticipated 2017 new installment; the films, both the originals and the J.J. Abrams reboot; and ancillary materials such as novelizations, comic books, videogames, etc.

READ the article