Latest Blog Posts

by PopMatters Staff

24 Aug 2016


Adriane Pontecorvo: Beautiful, soulful, and just a little otherworldly. There’s a tight simplicity at the core of both this song and its video: a voice, a woman, an empty room, piano notes spiraling upward. Within such clean lines, it’s that much more rewarding to go outside the box, glitching and syncopating, defying physics. The way the retro beats play together sounds almost childlike, and Lalin St. Juste’s voice is the perfect counterpoint, pouring through the spaces between keys and loops like honey. The only issue I have with this song is that I want so much more of it; at less than three minutes, this song will get a lot of repeat listens in anticipation of the full album release in October. [10/10]

by PopMatters Staff

24 Aug 2016


Photo: Bob Longley

Last year, we said of Liz Longley’s debut album, “Longley’s clearly ready to seize on stardom, and this album provides all the proof that’s needed.” Fast forward to 2016 and Longley is back with her sophomore effort Weightless, which is packed to the gills with instantly memorable pop rock songs, many of which could be chartbound. Longley’s songwriting is top notch, full of relatable tales of life and relationships and Weightless is the sort of Lilith Fair inspired album that speaks to Longley’s love of ‘90s music. “I grew up listening to music of the ‘90s, and this record feels more like the Sheryl Crow and Alanis Morissette in me,” Longley says. “All those powerful chick singer-songwriters I grew up loving.”

by PopMatters Staff

23 Aug 2016


William Sutton: “Bang Bang” is close to a return to form for Green Day following their disappointing trio of 2012 albums, Uno!, Dos! and Tre!. A searing pop punk number driven by thundering drums and bass, this track is, like much of their recent back catalogue, politically charged, as it addresses the prevalence of mass shootings in the US and how this interacts with an ever growing dominance of social media. Whilst “Bang Bang” is a good track and much better than most of their output since the release of American Idiot in 2004, the track struggles with the feeling that this is a band in their fourth decade and we have heard it all before and often heard it done better. Nonetheless it is a welcome return from the band and provides positive signs ahead of the release of Revolution Rock in October. [7/10]

by PopMatters Staff

23 Aug 2016


Photo: Shervin Lainez

New York’s Hollis Brown is masterful in their approach to American roots music, with the band drawing from rock ‘n’ roll, soul, country, and a bit of blues. Hollis Brown inhabits these musical forms with a surprising degree of naturalness given their youth and they look to become a seminal figure in the thriving and growing Americana scene. The band’s latest release, Cluster of Pearls, released last Record Store Day and now they have a brand new single to share, the uber soulful, deeply moving “Don’t Want to Miss You”, which channels some Otis Redding and Gram Parsons, as well as the heartbreak from a painful breakup.

by PopMatters Staff

23 Aug 2016


Photo: Jay Sansone

Eric Krasno has been a prolific musician over the past 20 years, co-founding both Soulive and Lettuce, while playing, producing and songwriting for a host of the music world’s leading lights, such as Tedeschi Trucks, Talib Kweli, Norah Jones and more. Stepping out on his own has allowed the virtuosic guitar master to quite literally find his own voice as he takes the mic for the first time revealing an affecting, gentle, bluesy soul man. On his latest single, “Jezebel”, Krasno lays out a mellow soul/blues vibe with some slinky, masterful guitar playing and a tale of love gone wrong.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

The Bric-a-Brac of Games

// Moving Pixels

"In gaming generally, relevant and irrelevant objects are forever separated because mixing them up might be too confusing for the player.

READ the article