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by PopMatters Staff

24 May 2016


Photo: Anya Roz

Hazmat Modine co-songwriter Wade Schuman sums up his band perfectly saying, “I think our band is like a really good NYC diner. The food comes from every tradition you can think of, but in the end it’s really the ultimate American comfort food.” Hazmat Modine’s membership includes musicians of various ages, races and backgrounds, a true melting pot, just like New York City, and their music draws from a host of American traditions including early jazz, the American popular songbook, blues, country, R&B, as well as a variety of world beats. It’s makes for exciting music that is always open to new influences and change. Hazmat Modine’s third album, Extra-Deluxe-Supreme, is meant as something of a document of their 10-year history and their adventures traveling the world, absorbing new influences and spreading American roots musics far and wide.

Hazmat Modine’s Extra-Deluxe-Supreme releases June 3rd via Barbès Records and today we are bringing you the video for the band’s new single, “Moving Stones”.

by PopMatters Staff

23 May 2016


Photo: Holly J. Schumacher

East Tennessee’s Derik Hultquist did what lots of musical dreamers do… he headed straight to Nashville after graduation. Like most, he worked the odd jobs to support himself while working hard on developing his songwriting as well as discovering his true singing voice. Hultquist has released a number of EPs over the years as his music progressed and now, after 10 years in Nashville, he is set to release his full-length debut album, Southern Iron, coming June 17th via Carnival Music/Thirty Tigers. Southern Iron is a well-crafted set of Hultquist’s original songs living in the country/pop sphere with songs that occasionally feature elements of psychedelic and roots rock.

by PopMatters Staff

23 May 2016


Pryor Stroud: In “Vapour Trail”, Lone dexterously melds a muscular hip-hop beat with a fidgety, chrome-coated electronic melody, forging a unique sound that seems, at once, anchored in cracked concrete and suspended in the clouds. As the track progresses, the reduplicated, half-legible vocal sample begins to assume a hypnotic quality—that is, it begins to pull you deeper into the track without announcing its intentions. This opens up a set of questions: where is Lone taking us? Where does this vapour trail lead? [7/10]

by PopMatters Staff

20 May 2016


Emmanuel Elone: It would be really easy to hate this song. Super Furry Animals lays on the “bing bong” line heavily across all five minutes of “BingBong’s” runtime, and there are moments in the beginning that feel obnoxious and frustrating as a result. However, once you look past the lack of lyrical ideas and the fairly excessive runtime, “BingBong” is actually pretty great. The beat is steady, and has a fantastic bass line at its core, while the simple lyrics float over the rhythm as another instrument of sorts. When “BingBong” is not being occasionally annoying, it’s fun, catchy and energetic, making it a great hit for the summer. [7/10]

by PopMatters Staff

20 May 2016


Pryor Stroud: Cryptic, moody, and possessed by a nearly Lynchian sense of unease, “New Age Thriller” is a demented avant-pop vignette that watches two lovers slip behind a wall of shadow to perform strange sexual acts. U.S. Girls—the alias for noise-art iconoclast Meghan Remy—drapes the track’s singsong melody in bizarre synth chimes and dark, monolithic electro tones that seem to rise out of the track’s background. “And I won’t provide it for you / Even though you / Even though you’ll force me to”, Remy sings, and you can sense that her lover is across from her behind a shifting curtain of darkness, his palm outstretched, beckoning her to step away from the light for a while. [7/10]

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