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by Sarah Zupko

20 Jul 2017


Photo: Doron Gild (Mute Records)

Legendary synthpop duo Erasure returned with their 17th studio album this year and are showing no signs of slowing down as they continue to release compelling music year after year. Really anything synthpop god Vince Clarke does is worthy of notice and Andy Bell’s voice is as gorgeous and emotive as always.

by Sarah Zupko

19 Jul 2017


Photo: Ritch Capriotti

Jeff Beck once said of the Legendary Shack Shakers that they were “a cross between the Yard Birds and the Sex Pistols”, which sounds just about right. Legendary Shack Shakers have always channeled the energy and rawness of punk into their rockabilly and psychobilly drenched music. It’s an irresistible mixture. On their latest album, After You’ve Gone releasing August 25th via Last Chance Records, the band ratchets up the lo-fi elements while exploring the aftermath and pain of marital breakdown and divorce.

by Ian King

18 Jul 2017


Photo: Raisa Sandstrom

Concept albums are old news, concept identities are where it’s at. Louise Chicoine is the agile voice behind the ‘fictional diva’ Banny Grove, an alter-ego constructed with guitarist/keyboardist Peter Nichols. The LA-based duo originally hail from Vermont, and while those roots make it tempting to look for any traces of a Phish-y sense of humor, their new Cars in Control EP is much more a product of, and response to, Southern California’s bright sprawling artifice.

Banny Grove debuted last year with an album that asked Who Is She?, but Cars in Control is more inclined to keep offering curious clues than answer such questions. The title track goes after “the oil man” with spare synthpop abstraction. “Baby” rides an unblinking combination of plucked harp and post-ironic autotune. “Trash Truck”, which is “sung from the optimistic perspective of a child living underground when the surface world is an unseen desert of garbage”, winds strands of Christmas lights around the Cure’s “Kyoto Song”. The EP is out August 8th via Nicey Music. 

by Jonathan Frahm

17 Jul 2017


Photo: Kim Sommers (Team Clermont)

Written, produced, and performed inside of a garden shed studio, Brad Peterson‘s upcoming Ellipsis Album is perhaps the purest definition of “indie record” imaginable. On the psychedelic, ebullient folk-rock of his latest single, “What the Open Heart Allows”, Peterson develops a dreamy landscape by deftly fusing synthetic instruments with organic ones. As a synth orchestra pervades the track, banjo and drums are included to create a compelling world all the singer-songwriter’s own.

by PopMatters Staff

17 Jul 2017


Paul Carr: This is a big, bold statement of intent from Arcade Fire. There is a clear and admirable desire for the band not to spend too long in the same space and to mine their DNA to reinvigorate themselves. The big synths and angular new wave of early ‘80s the Cure sound fresh and like nothing the band has done before. Despite the retro stylings, the subject matter is refreshingly current as the group deal with the quest for personal validation from family, friends, and strangers, the anxieties of negative body image and the relentless pursuit of fame at the expense of everything else. The band cleverly offer a metaphorical panacea for all of these ills in the form of Creature comfort. Something to numb the pain. This is a song that leaves you anything but anesthetized. [9/10]

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