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by PopMatters Staff

28 Apr 2016


Pryor Stroud: Evolving from a cinematic skyscape to a piston-pumping house anthem, “Born Slippy” remains one of Underworld’s most mesmerizing and uplifting slices of electronica. Its effortless amalgamation of varying components—incantatory chanting, echoing synth pulses, thump-thump-thump drum machine programming—has since served as a template for countless producers working in a similar mode. [9/10]

by PopMatters Staff

28 Apr 2016


Pryor Stroud: Pounding, repetitive, and replete with an unwavering sonic concentration, “Die Schallplatte” takes the most basic elements of Kraftwerkian synthpop and integrates them into a strobe light-mimicking exercise in dancefloor hypnosis. The six-note-then-seven-note synth riff that anchors the track is particularly well-executed; its caustic, fizzling texture brings to mind a bio-mechanical attempt to animate a dying organism - you or, perhaps, something more sinister - through a dangerously high electrical charge. [7/10]

by PopMatters Staff

28 Apr 2016


Pryor Stroud: “For What It’s Worth” is an atmospheric R&B slow jam that seems to be on the verge of a self-destructive nervous breakdown; both vocalists, in a mere moment or two, could succumb to an onslaught of uncontrollable weeping, and the beat—a network of noxiously woozy bass and high-reverb electro blips—likewise could bottom-out at any second and strand these vocalists in the very psychic emptiness that they seem to be combatting. All-in-all, the track’s take on downcast, pseudo-sung hip-hop is nothing you couldn’t get from a throwaway Drake song, but its acute sense of sonic melancholy is deserving of multiple listens. [6/10]

by Cole Waterman

28 Apr 2016


Genre blending is the modus operandi for multi-instrumentalist and producer Kyle Norton, based in Grand Rapids, Michigan. “I Feel Like I’m on Fire”, the lead track of his debut EP under new moniker Norty, is testament to that. With a electronic bedrock, it opens with an anachronistic jazz lounge bassline, piano notes, and brushed drums. The atmosphere is thick and swirls like curlicues of smoke as tempos shift, Norty’s relaxed vocals and hip hop beats join the sound collage.

by Eric Risch

28 Apr 2016


With Gothic repose, North Carolina singer/songwriter Jeremy Squires intones, “Sending arrows straight / Balance targets on my head / Solitary space / For you I would change”, on “Carry You”, the opening song from his latest album, Shadows.

//Mixed media
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'SUPERHOTLine Miami' Is Exactly What It Sounds Like

// Moving Pixels

"SUPERHOTLine Miami provides a perfect case study in how slow-motion affects the pace and tone of a game.

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