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by Alex Suskind

18 May 2010


The last time Hi-Tek and Talib Kweli collaborated, it was 2000 and they were the duo Reflection Eternal. The result of their partnership was the critically-acclaimed album, Train of Thought. At the time, it was only Kweli’s second official studio album (the first being Mos Def and Talib Kweli Are Black Star in 1998). Talib’s first solo effort, Quality, wouldn’t hit shelves until 2002. Both still relatively new to hip-hop in 2000, the two produced a bold, hard-hitting album, with Kweli’s powerful rhymes and Tek’s beats rooted in ‘70s soul.

Now, almost 10 years after the release of Train of Thought, they are joining forces once again for their second studio effortRevolutions Per Minute (they also released a mixtape in 2009 called
The RE:Union. While one would assume that the words indie hip-hop and Entertainment Weekly would never be uttered in the same breath, the pop-culture magazine is currently streaming Revolutions Per Minute in its entirety.

On top of that, there are three videos posted below. The first two, “In This World” and “Strangers,” are singles from the new CD. The third is a throwback: “The Blast” from their first album, Train of Thought.

by AJ Ramirez

18 May 2010


Early on the morning of May 18, 1980, Joy Division singer Ian Curtis committed suicide by hanging himself in the kitchen of his Macclesfield, England home. Despite the short body of work he produced (one full-length album plus a clutch of singles and EPs by the time of his death at age 23, soon followed by a second album and other posthumous releases), Ian Curtis’ music with Joy Division has gained a legendary stature in the subsequent decades. Noted for his frenzied performance style, his dark, literate lyrics, and his doomy proto-goth baritone, in death Curtis has become an icon of the post-punk movement in particular and underground rock music in general, continuing to influence scores of artists to this day.

In honor of Curtis’ legacy, here are a pair of videos that showcase his indomitable stage presence in life, followed by Anton Corbijn’s 1988 music video for the Joy Division song “Atmosphere”, quite possibly the most exquisite and beautifully-crafted posthumous tribute the medium has ever produced. As a bonus, also included is Radiohead’s cover of “Ceremony” (originally released as the debut single by Joy Division’s successor group New Order), one of the last songs Curtis ever wrote.

by J.M. Suarez

17 May 2010


The first new Pernice Brothers album since 2006’s Live a Little, Goodbye, Killer is set to be released on June 15. The band is currently streaming three songs from the album: “Not the Loving Kind”, “F**king and Flowers”, and “We Love the Stage”.  Another song from the upcoming release, “Jacqueline Susann”, is also available as a free MP3 download. The Pernice Brothers are also running a special promotion with a pre-order of the album that includes a free copy of the book Pernice to Me.

SONG LIST
01 Bechamel
02 Jacqueline Susann
03 We Love the Stage
04 The Loving Kind
05 Something for You
06 Goodbye, Killer
07 The Great Depression
08 Newport News
09 F*cking and Flowers
10 The End of Faith

by Dean Blumberg

17 May 2010


Do you ever lie awake at night, amongst a room cluttered with Black Flag, Misfits, and Samhain posters, wondering what it would be like if Henry Rollins and Glenn Danzig were, you know, really close and intimate? Fortunately I’m not the only one because Tom Neely and alt-comix/art crew Igloo Tornado present Henry and Glenn Forever, a new mini-comic billed as “the love story to end all love stories.”

The book showcases 64 pages of Henry and Glenn as the sensitive and tender companions we have been hoping they were. Oh yeah, John Hall and Darryl Oates are Henry and Glenn’s satan-worshipping evil next-door neighbors. Henry and Glenn Forever is a Cantankerous Titles release available for purchase (only $4!) from Microcosm Publishing.

by Bill Clifford

17 May 2010


For anyone who may have missed it, Late Night with Jimmy Fallon hosted a week-long promotion last week of the re-release of one of classic rock’s most renowned recordings, The Rolling Stones’ Exile on Main Street. The promotion also coincided with the premiere of Stones in Exile, a DVD documentary of the making of the double record masterpiece. The reissue comes in three editions: the classic 18-track CD; a deluxe CD package that includes 10 unearthed tracks – including four that didn’t make the original recording and haven’t been heard until now; and a super-deluxe package that includes a vinyl copy, a CD and the 30-minute documentary as well as a 50-page photo book. Friday night’s show included the premiere of the 30-minute documentary.

Lest that history be lost on the youth, Fallon invited guest musicians on the show to cover songs from Exile on Main Street, four of whom are young enough to have been children when the original recording was released. Below are the videos from long time Stones friend and contributor Taj Mahal, performing “Shine a Light”, Green Day playing “Rip This Joint”, Keith Urban’s take on “Tumbling Dice”,  Sheryl Crow with “All Down the Line”, and Phish offering up “Loving Cup”. Guests in some of the performances include Fallon’s house band, the Roots, as well as Rolling Stone touring musicians Chuck Leavell.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

The Specter of Multiplayer Hangs Over 'Door Kickers'

// Moving Pixels

"Door Kickers is not a multiplayer game, but for a while there, I couldn’t tell the difference.

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