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by PopMatters Staff

28 Apr 2016


Pryor Stroud: Pounding, repetitive, and replete with an unwavering sonic concentration, “Die Schallplatte” takes the most basic elements of Kraftwerkian synthpop and integrates them into a strobe light-mimicking exercise in dancefloor hypnosis. The six-note-then-seven-note synth riff that anchors the track is particularly well-executed; its caustic, fizzling texture brings to mind a bio-mechanical attempt to animate a dying organism - you or, perhaps, something more sinister - through a dangerously high electrical charge. [7/10]

by PopMatters Staff

28 Apr 2016


Pryor Stroud: “For What It’s Worth” is an atmospheric R&B slow jam that seems to be on the verge of a self-destructive nervous breakdown; both vocalists, in a mere moment or two, could succumb to an onslaught of uncontrollable weeping, and the beat—a network of noxiously woozy bass and high-reverb electro blips—likewise could bottom-out at any second and strand these vocalists in the very psychic emptiness that they seem to be combatting. All-in-all, the track’s take on downcast, pseudo-sung hip-hop is nothing you couldn’t get from a throwaway Drake song, but its acute sense of sonic melancholy is deserving of multiple listens. [6/10]

by Cole Waterman

28 Apr 2016


Genre blending is the modus operandi for multi-instrumentalist and producer Kyle Norton, based in Grand Rapids, Michigan. “I Feel Like I’m on Fire”, the lead track of his debut EP under new moniker Norty, is testament to that. With a electronic bedrock, it opens with an anachronistic jazz lounge bassline, piano notes, and brushed drums. The atmosphere is thick and swirls like curlicues of smoke as tempos shift, Norty’s relaxed vocals and hip hop beats join the sound collage.

by Eric Risch

28 Apr 2016


With Gothic repose, North Carolina singer/songwriter Jeremy Squires intones, “Sending arrows straight / Balance targets on my head / Solitary space / For you I would change”, on “Carry You”, the opening song from his latest album, Shadows.

by PopMatters Staff

27 Apr 2016


Photo: Joanna Chattman

Emmanuel Elone: There’s a lot to like about “Porch Light”, from it’s beautiful fingerpicking to the sweet fiddle sections. However, the best part, in my opinion, about the song are O’Donovan’s vocals, which are eerily reminiscent of Indigo Girls. At times, it can feel a bit sleepy, especially when the delicate instrumentation and O’Donovan’s melodic vocals combine, but “Porch Lights” is still a great country folk song at its core. [7/10]

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Supernatural: Season 11, Episode 19 - "The Chitters"

// Channel Surfing

"Another stand-alone episode, but there's still plenty to discuss in the Supernatural world.

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