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by PopMatters Staff

22 Apr 2016


Pryor Stroud: A bombastic, multi-episode indie rock opera based on the Grateful Dead’s project of the same name, “Terrapin Station” swells with novelistic ambition and fills its over-15-minute length with a variety of interlocking aesthetics, moods, and pop music templates. While it definitely necessitates a prolonged listening experience, it is deserving of the effort it requires, as the sense of narrative it generates—of following a character through multiple settings and situations—is hard to come by in contemporary rock. [7/10]

by PopMatters Staff

22 Apr 2016


Photo: Alicia J. Rose

Chris Ingalls: Bob Mould has been on a creative and commercial high point lately; his last few albums have combined crunchy guitars, introspective lyrics and smart melodies more effectively than anything since late Hüsker Dü. This time around, it ain’t broke and he ain’t fixing it. The guitars are still high in the mix and there’s minimal fussing involved. Mould continues to stay relevant well into his AARP years. The fact that he is constantly writing and staying true to his vision while sounding current and relevant is highly commendable… and rare. [8/10]

by Sarah Zupko

22 Apr 2016


Photo: Dwight Marshall

Back in March New Orleans roots rocker Anders Osborne released his latest album, Spacedust & Ocean Views. “These 12 songs speak about places dear to me, places I feel something profound about, but there’s also the presence of the universe,” explains Osborne. Indeed, the titles of the songs speak to the geographies explored on the album with titles like “Pontchartrain”, “Lafayette”, “Move Back to Mississippi”, and “Cape Cod”. Osborne has always been a wanderer and a restless musical soul. After all, he’s traveled relentlessly, finally settling in New Orleans in 1989 as his main base. Osborne is also quite the road warrior, touring nearly continually, soaking up the music, food and stories of the many places he visits.

by PopMatters Staff

21 Apr 2016


Pryor Stroud: Mixing insistent house percussion with Crystal Castles-esque dark-electro, Moiré‘s “Lines + Colours” is the soundtrack for a futuristic nightclub scene modeled around a new synthetic drug. Once taken, this drug manufactures startling illusions: the hyper-sensory stimuli of the post-midnight world - neon, shadow, reverberation, flesh-to-flesh contact—all seem to become different gravitational forces acting on your body, thereby simulating a sense of ecstatic weightlessness, of being adrift in your own skin. Through the lens of this drug, the Kraftwerkian synthesizer blips of “Lines + Colours” psychoactively morph into dueling lateral pressures—move this way, move that way—that engender the feeling of being in two places at once and, likewise, of not being confined to either. [8/10]

by PopMatters Staff

21 Apr 2016


Nathaniel Schwass: “Ghetto Walkin’” is a raw, soulful single from the up and coming Miles Davis and Robert Glasper project entitled Everything Is Beautiful. On this jazzy track, master takes from Davis’ work with Columbia Records have been compiled and reworked by Glasper to create a remote, somber affect that is well represented by the creative artwork of its complementary video. The harsh stoicism of the urban-sprawl is emoted in the sketchwork of the animation, seemingly influenced by the artwork of Jean-Michel Basquiat. The complementary video highlights the existential crisis of black, urban subjecthood as vocalist Bilal sings “So low I’m thinking one way out / In a box, In a church, and the people shout / Grandma’s hands prayed for me / But these streets still preyed on me.” The remorseful interiority of urban life expressed is similarly expressed in Mac Miller’s song “Friends” from his Faces mixtape, which also samples Davis’ “The Ghetto Walk”. The tempo of “Ghetto Walkin” is noticeably faster than the Davis original, yet it creates a rich texture of sound that is well paced by the dry percussion. The layering of sound on this single is incredibly rich, from the powerful emotive qualities of the vocals to the sweet nuances of it’s forlorn strings. This modern re-working of Davis’ sound is well arranged by Glasper, but it lacks the thought-provoking surprise of Davis’ improvisation. Given the nature of the project, this lack is lessened by the aesthetic cohesion of Glasper’s work, and the euphony of the track breathes life into the work of Davis and his musical legacy. [8/10]

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Supernatural: Season 11, Episode 19 - "The Chitters"

// Channel Surfing

"Another stand-alone episode, but there's still plenty to discuss in the Supernatural world.

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