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by PopMatters Staff

13 Aug 2010


The Walkmen are releasing their latest album, Lisbon, 14 September via Fat Possum Records. Last night they stopped by Jimmy Fallon’s show to preview a tune off the new record.

by J.M. Suarez

13 Aug 2010


The fourth video released from Tegan and Sara’s 2009 album, Sainthood, “Northshore” offers up a punk-influenced track that’s fun, catchy, and energetic with a video to match.

by PopMatters Staff

12 Aug 2010


Simian Mobile Disco
Is Fixed
(Defend Music)
Releasing: 12 October

The UK’s Simian Mobile Disco has a new remix CD headed your way this October and they’ve just made a track available for free download, “Nerve Salad”. This is the first release in a planned series of discs celebrating the FIXED parties in New York City.

SONG LIST
01 Brain Machine: “Eternal Night”
02 Etienne Jaumet: “For Falling Asleep”
03 Jurek Przezdziecki: “Qwerty Poema”
04 Conrad Schnitzler: “Ballet Statique”
05 André Walter: “Malphas”
06 Bam Bam: “Where’s Your Child?”
07 DJ Hell: “U Can Dance (SMD Mix)”
08 Paul Woolford: “False Prophet”
09 Philip Sherburne: “Salt and Vinegar”
10 Clement Meyer: “Midnight Madness”
11 Simian Mobile Disco: “Nerve Salad”
12 Pantha Du Prince: “Behind the Stars”
13 Hot Chip: “One Life Stand (Carl Craig Mix)”
14 Chateau Flight: “Baroque”
15 SND: “05:36:58”
16 Delia Derbyshire: “Dreams”

by Jason Cook

12 Aug 2010


Barreled forth on the backs of de Sade, Courbet, Bataille, and others, New French Extremity is a transgressive movement within all of the French arts but bloomed perhaps most colorfully by this century’s newest fork of body-horror films: It’s a not revival and for the most part, even if you’re not interested in seeing Willem Dafoe and Charlotte Gainsbourg having their genitals mutilated [See 2009’s Antichrist], it’s horrible fun.

For more, check out Trouble Every Day (2001);  Haute Tension (2003); and Frontière(s) (2007);.

by Jimmy Callaway

12 Aug 2010


In the Delaware tribe of Native Americans, when a young boy begins to reach manhood, he is to undertake a “vision quest”, going into the woods alone to forge for himself and reach a greater spiritual awareness. To that boy’s counterpart in modern middle-class society, this may sound insane. This could be because that particular demographic is woefully displaced from the greater spiritual concerns of more indigenous peoples. Or it could be that those suburbanites’ own rites of passage are just as insane.

“Becoming a Man” is one of the six sketches troupe member Bruce McCulloch also directed for The Kids in the Hall. The sketch originally aired in 1993, and it deftly shows McCulloch’s fondness for exposing the surreality of the North American socio-cultural experience. As Chad’s father gets more and more drunk, McCulloch’s use of quick cuts captures the young boy’s jarring encounter with the grown-up world, as does the expression on the uncredited child actor’s face.  Also turning in a grand performance is troupe member Kevin McDonald. The Kids in the Hall as a troupe often played the female roles in their sketches, but in this case, it especially helps to lighten the darker undertone of the sketch, to provide a sort of comic relief, as it were. McDonald also aptly portrays the suburban mom: completely out of the loop as to the events of the day and left in the wake, forced to keep the party going, a smile plastered to her face. But upon Chad’s return, that genuine smile of understanding lets the audience know that Chad has at least some positive emotional base at home.

The rite of passage for young boys in our modern society is rarely heralded by fanfare; in fact, it is rarely acknowledged at all and has become more and more individualized over the years. But as The Kids in the Hall skews the tradition, it seems the greatest rite of passage, the one in common for all young men, is the day they realize their parents—and by extension, all adults—are as scared and weak and confused by life as they themselves are.

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