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by PopMatters Staff

18 Jul 2016


Pryor Stroud: Taken from Mvula’s latest release The Dreaming Room, “Show Me Love” is an incantatory, gospel-tinged art-pop hymnal that drifts from moments of deep personal introspection to fissions of out-of-body spiritual awareness. The climactic eruption of orchestration is startling in its intensity; over it, Mvula repeats the title phrase over and over and over again, trying to stretch it out, to discover its true contents and phonetic subtleties, and to discern if expressing her love in the exact right way—“You show me love / You show me love / You show me love”—can somehow approximate the true feeling it gives her. [8/10]

by Eric Risch

18 Jul 2016


Musical malcontent Adam Payne needs action. As the ringleader of Residual Echoes, Payne has released three fistfuls of albums this century while splitting time playing with other acts including 6 Organs of Admittance, Cass McCombs, Gun Outfit and King Tuff to name just a few.

by Will Rivitz

18 Jul 2016


The video for Cowboy Mouth‘s “Broken Up” is partly set in a brewery, which is an accurate distillation (pardon the pun) of the song’s sound. It’s a chunk of cheeky punk rock along the lines of the Dropkick Murphys, simple and memorable I-V-I chord progression and loud, crashing drums. Drummer and lead singer Fred LeBlanc’s nasally vocals properly fit the snarky vibe of the song’s lyrics, a kind of “screw you” to the girl who’s just broken up with the narrator. It’s altogether a cheery ode to the break-up — and, given the wholesome, raucous punk featured herein, the video and lyrics fit perfectly with the music.

by Will Rivitz

15 Jul 2016


The video for Aphty Khea‘s “Onyx Glitz”, shot by videographer Benjamin Brookes, features body parts snapping together and apart under an eerie ultraviolet light. It’s appropriate imagery for the song itself, a sinewy piece of dubstep which undulates lethargically under piano and massive bass. It’s at times the pristine jazz vibes of Submotion Orchestra, at times the unsettling wormholes of Hyperdub’s formative years, and always everything which made the genre compelling to begin with. Menacingly spacious and elegantly caustic, it shows there’s yet life in the bassy half-time world.

by Will Rivitz

15 Jul 2016


The electropop of Nashville’s Chaos Emeralds is a maximalist version of the genre, everything within their grasp ballooning to massive size. “Untied”, with its gigantic toms, neon arpeggios, and buzzing bass, rams it home: if something is worth doing, it’s worth doing big. And it’s nice that things are, indeed, this big: the song is a delectable slice of hyper-sugary cake, white-boy R&B if the genre had injected approximately seven liters of Pepsi intravenously before performing. It’s brash and loud, and it’s all the better for it.

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Call For Papers: Celebrating Star Trek's 50th Anniversary

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"To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the hit franchise, PopMatters seeks submissions about Star Trek, including: the TV series, from The Original Series (TOS) to the highly anticipated 2017 new installment; the films, both the originals and the J.J. Abrams reboot; and ancillary materials such as novelizations, comic books, videogames, etc.

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