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by Sarah Zupko

15 Feb 2010

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Guggenheim Museum in New York, a space known for great art exhibitions and for being a work of art itself, the iconic structure having been designed by Frank Lloyd Wright. It’s also popularly used as a movie set. To mark the historic occasion, the museum commissioned some 200 artists to create speculative reinventions of the building’s interior space, treating the vast inside expanse as a brand new canvas. The exhibit, fittingly titled “Contemplating the Void”, began this past Friday and runs through 28 April. You can view an online version of the exhibition here and the few samples below give you the idea of what to expect from this intriguing project.

by Jonas Jacobs

15 Feb 2010

Today was the best Valentine’s Day ever. I worked a weekend shift at Edible Arrangements to make some extra cash. Edible Arrangements makes flower bouquets out of fruit. All of the flowers are made in the store, in case you were wondering…

I got to work at eight in the morning, collected my jobs and left the store to make deliveries around Los Angeles. It was unseasonably warm with joyously clear skies, a great day to drive around with the windows down and listen to your music really loud. I had to keep the arrangements frigid, them being perishable and all. So, unfortunately, I was driving around with the AC full blast and I’m not a fan of AC. 

Either way, I had my music. And even though I was alone, each delivery promised a new and exciting encounter with a customer as well. Once I was done with each round of deliveries and all of the fruit bouquets were dropped off, I turned off the AC and rolled down the windows for some glorious music listening fun. I selected Manu Chau’s “Clandestino” from the iPod section of my iPhone, and engaged the Genius feature. Throughout the day, I simply hit “Refresh” and a newly shuffled, slightly altered playlist would commence again. Below, a sampling from the soundtrack of the day…


by Crispin Kott

13 Feb 2010

During last night’s interminably long opening ceremonies of the Vancouver Olympics, the b-list remake of a song that wasn’t terribly good 25 years ago received its official premiere. For those of us who ordinarily derive pleasure from being sarcastic and pseudo-witty about popular culture, the group assembled to perform this song is almost too good to be true. But when the cause is so seemingly worthy, is it still okay to chortle when Celine Dion hyper-emotes? Is it wrong for me to titter when even Jamie Foxx doesn’t look like he can believe how earnest he’s trying to appear in his introduction? Does Justin Bieber really sound like that? Vince Vaughn? Seriously? Haven’t the people of Haiti suffered enough?

This is no knock on the cause, which has seen an outpouring of support for a country that even before being leveled by a massive earthquake last month was in dire conditions. But haven’t everyday people like you and me already made up our minds about donating money/goods/time by this point? Does the ghost of Michael Jackson really have any pull in this matter?

Is it gauche to criticize the song itself for being underwritten and overstuffed given its intended purpose both then and now was to garner humanitarian support? Can we still blame Bob Geldof for any of this?

by Jennifer Cooke

13 Feb 2010

Iconic British fashion designer Alexander McQueen died 11 February 2010. His incredible creativity and vision made him a favorite in rock ‘n’ roll and pop music from the inception of his career. His collaboration with Björk produced the cover of her 1997 album Homogenic, and he also directed the video for the song “Alarm Call”. It’s bizarre and off-kilter and wonderful and visually stunning, like everything that Alexander McQueen created. His loss will be felt far beyond the realms of the fashion industry.

by PopMatters Staff

13 Feb 2010

British girl poppers the Pipettes have gone all retro sci-fi on us in their latest video. The tune will be on the group’s upcoming and currently unnamed album.

//Mixed media

Because Blood Is Drama: Considering Carnage in Video Games and Other Media

// Moving Pixels

"It's easy to dismiss blood and violence as salacious without considering why it is there, what its context is, and what it might communicate.

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