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by Alex Suskind

22 Jun 2010


Since 1970, the Glastonbury Festival for Contemporary Performing Arts in England has been a staple for music festivals all over the world. It began 40 years ago (although this isn’t the 40th time the festival has taken place. There have been several years where Glastonbury did not happen), when Marc Bolan, Keith Christmas, Stackridge, Al Stewart and Quintessence played for 1,500 music fans on a farm in Pilton, UK. Back then, the price for admission was £1 including free milk from the farm.

A lot has changed in the past four decades. Glastonbury is now regularly attended by more than 100,000 people each year and tickets run well over £200. This year’s event is being headlined by Gorillaz, Muse and Stevie Wonder.

In honor of the 2010 Glastonbury Festival, which takes place from 24th June - 27th June, we take a look at back at some of the most memorable performances in the festival’s history after the jump…

by Maria Schurr

22 Jun 2010


Toy Story 3 proved itself to be both a critical and box office smash this past weekend, breaking records as Pixar Studios’ highest-grossing opening weekend and earning a 98% on Rotten Tomatoes.

Yet, there are bound to be contrarians among us, those longing for a bit of grit beneath that Pixar sheen. Thankfully, someone with a keen sense of humor and exemplary syncing up skills has answered our prayers with a trailer that crosses Toy Story with The Greatest Television Show Of All Time, The Wire.

We can only hope that Jon Lasseter’s people will be making negotiations with David Chase’s people before the week is out.

by Alex Suskind

22 Jun 2010


For almost five decades, Herbie Hancock has provided listeners with a wide variety of traditional and experimental jazz records. With 46 studio albums, 12 Grammy Awards (including the award for Best Album for 2008’s River: The Joni Letters) and one Oscar under his belt, there is very little the iconic pianist and composer has left to accomplish.

Therefore, it is always interesting to see what route Hancock plans on taking with each project. Since his 1962 debut, Takin’ Off, he has written and recorded everything from jazz standards to electronic and hip-hop based instrumentals.

For his newest record, The Imagine Project, Hancock decided to go a route similar to that of his last two albums. For 2005’s Possibilities, he recruited John Mayer, Carlos Santana, Paul Simon and Trey Anastasio, among others, to cover a range of popular R&B and rock hits. In 2008, he invited singers like Leonard Cohen, Tina Turner and Norah Jones to cover songs by singer-songwriter Joni Mitchell on River: The Joni Letters.

On 22 June, Hancock’s Imagine sees him collaborating with more contemporary artists, including John Legend, Pink and Dave Matthews. On the record’s opening track, a cover of John Lennon’s Imagine, Pink, India.Arie, Jeff Beck and Seal join Hancock for a jazzed up version of the 1971 tune. Matthews shows up later to help out on another Lennon-penned tune, 1966’s “Tomorrow Never Knows”, off the Beatles’ Revolver.

The album is currently streaming on NPR.

by Alistair Dickinson

21 Jun 2010


Kazuo Ishiguro’s devastating novel Never Let Me Go is making its way to the big screen. The film adaptation stars the dead-on cast of Carey Mulligan and Keira Knightley, and comes with a script by The Beach/28 Days Later/Sunshine scribe Alex Garland. Check out the trailer for this warped coming-of-age tale below and—if you’ve read the book—try and decide how spoilery the “sometime after your third donation…” line might be to the uninitiated.

by Jessy Krupa

18 Jun 2010


The last big animated hit at the box office was DreamWorks’ How to Train Your Dragon, which has taken in over $400 million worldwide since it opened last March. A mixture of great reviews, happy early audiences, and a relentless merchandising campaign spearheaded by Wal-Mart turned the movie into a big success. However, this week, a new animated movie is seeking ticket sales, the highly anticipated Toy Story 3. Not surprisingly, its makers seem to be using the same strategy as Dragon’s backers did, in featuring the film in a couple of high-profile commercials. Whereas recent flop Shrek Forever After used the same cliched trailers and McDonalds promotions in order to spread the word, Toy Story 3 is serving up interesting commercials that manage to boost two different products/services to consumers.

Somehow, this commercial for the Visa debit card introduces you to the movie’s central characters, makes you want to see more of them, and makes you want to use your Visa debit card to buy official merchandise at a local toy store. I adore the attention to detail put into this. At the very beginning, the toys are standing on top of a display for the probably fictional “Red Herring” board game, which advertises itself as “a game of skills and scales”.

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