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by Sarah Zupko

17 Jan 2017


Photo: Sergio Lopez and Kelly Rashka

Lance Washington (a.k.a. Lando Chill) lost his father at the tender age of four and it has left a mark on him, one that he needed to address in artistic fashion to help him deal with the pain. Washington grew up in Chicago but moved to Arizona for college, and he took up poetry before diving head-long into music. Those sunny climes of Arizona have worn off on Washington, putting the real “chill” in Chill’s moniker. That and some stellar OG Kush that Chill celebrates in his song “Early in the Morning”.

Chill’s sound is soulful, warm and groovy, his honey-esque flow utterly irresistible and enticing. The video for “Early in the Morning”, which appears on Chill’s 2016 debut album, For Mark, Your Son, was shot in Northern Arizona and features Chill and his girlfriend on a road trip, spending the day in nature with some great herb and each other. This take on the song is a live band version, and it suggests the direction the artist is heading on his upcoming new record planned for this summer via Mello Music Group.

by PopMatters Staff

16 Jan 2017


Los Angeles’ ENTRANCE has just released a timely new protest song “Not Gonna Say Your Name” targeted right at Donald Trump. All proceeds from sales of the song will benefit Planned Parenthood directly. ENTRANCE’s new album Book of Changes, the first in nearly a decade releases 24 February via Thrill Jockey.

by PopMatters Staff

16 Jan 2017


Paul Carr: This is an artifact from the origins of punk that still sounds as vital and alive as it did then. The song is a powerful, spit and vinegar, aural assault, full of genuine working class angst. Chords are torn and shredded with the words hurtling past at a furious pace. A testament to the powers of youth, yet as important now as it ever has been. This is punk. Nothing held back. No thought of tomorrow. No pauses. No rest. No future. [9/10]

by PopMatters Staff

13 Jan 2017


Photo: Jen Rosenstein

Los Angeles’ pop artist MILCK (a.k.a. Connie Lim) started out playing the pop game and trying to conform to gender and racial stereotypes, but’s she too smart and creative to have kept that up for long. Renaming herself MILCK, she cast off the expectations of others and decided to focus on developing her unique voice. In doing so, MILCK has become an artist to watch for her truth to power approach to her new music.

by PopMatters Staff

13 Jan 2017


Paul Carr: Over rudimentary beats and the barest of bass lines, Sleaford Mods address the collapse of one of the UK’s oldest and most famous department store chains. Rather than a furious protest anthem for the 99% or a rousing anthem against the fat cats that get rich at the expense of the little man, it is delivered as a pithy statement of fact. A tacit acknowledgment that there is no fairness in society and the rich man is, inevitably always going to win, leaving the vultures to pick over the carcasses they leave behind. Moreover, the band maintains their ability to describe the grubby mundanity of everyday British life. There is no grandeur or attempt to explore life’s big questions. No real stylistic “growth”. This is what Sleaford Mods do, and it is what it is. Just don’t come looking for answers. [7/10]

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