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by William Carl Ferleman

4 Nov 2010

The Rolling Stones’ co-lyricist and guitarist Keith Richards was on NPR recently promoting his memoir, Life. Most of the chatter has centered on the Jagger-Richards relationship, but during this interview with Terry Gross, Richards theorizes about “Under My Thumb”, one of the songs he did not actually write. The argument at hand: Are the song’s lyrics anti-girl, or not? See if you can follow his logic here: “You can take it as, you know, male-female, like or it’s just people. I mean, it could be about a guy. It could’ve been, you know, this is just a guy singing, you know, that probably you’re actually under her thumb and you’re just trying to fight back. You know, and these are all sort of relationships and stuff. And I wouldn’t take it as any sexist, I can’t even go there, you know, cause I don’t think about it. I just think we know what some people are like and then those things happen. And anyway, I didn’t write the lyrics.” Thoughts?

by Matt Mazur

4 Nov 2010

A pair of legendary Oscar-winning actors, Ellen Burstyn (Alice Doesn’t Live Here Anymore) and Martin Landau (Ed Wood), team up to tell this sensitive, holiday-themed love story that centers on lonely, elderly grocery store bagger Robert (Landau) inexplicably finding love for the very first time in his life with his new neighbor Mary (Burstyn).

Here we have an actual mature adults, over 70, taking control of the dramatic action, proving that love is not just for the young. It is definitely a refreshing change of pace to be reminded that fairytale cinematic romances are not just for Miley Cyrus or teenage vampires. Sometimes people fall in love late in life, despite the odds, but very few films actually get made about them, nor are there many opportunities to see Burstyn or Landau in the substantial leading roles they deserve.

Co-starring Elizabeth Banks and Adam Scott, Lovely, Still will be available on DVD November 9th.

by Timothy Gabriele

4 Nov 2010

Stellar Om Source’s diluted atmospherics for the wonderful Olde English Spelling Bee label are given a properly hallucinatory rendering in VHS acid technicolor. Man, that food looks good!

by PopMatters Staff

4 Nov 2010

“When your opponent states clearly that ‘our #1 job in the next two years is to make sure you don’t have a second term—our #1 job is to defeat you and to embarrass you,’ you don’t respond with Kumbaya….”—Michael Moore

by Matt Mazur

3 Nov 2010

Though I normally will follow Naomi Watts wherever she wants to take me, her latest film—about outed CIA agent Valerie Plame from Bourne director Doug Liman—failed to fully ignite despite a committed performance from the actress.

The problem seemed to be in Liman’s turgid desire to turn the actress and the character into a real-life, female version of Bourne. There is unfortunately nothing new brought to the conversation from Liman and screenwriter Jez Butterworth (Birthday Girl), leaving Watts and co-star Sean Penn (who were so electric in 21 Grams together) grasping at cliches and regurgitated news from 2003.

Fair Game will be out in limited release November 5 and will expand throughout the month, but don’t beat yourself up if you can’t make it to the theater - this is a film that will play just fine on DVD, on the small screen. If you are looking for a dose of Watts that is far superior, check out her remarkable work in Rodrigo Garcia’s Mother and Child.

//Mixed media

Tricks or Treats? Ten Halloween Blu-rays That May Disrupt Your Life

// Short Ends and Leader

"The best of this stuff'll kill you.

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