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by Tyler Gould

16 Sep 2009


Sufjan Stevens
The BQE
(Asthmatic Kitty)
Releasing: 20 October

Sufjan Stevens’ Brooklyn-Queens Expressway-inspired multimedia performance, The BQE, a pastiche of film, music, and hula-hooping, only graced the stage and screen for a brief moment in October of 2007 at the Brooklyn Academy of Music’s Next Wave Festival, but will be seeing new life in a release from Asthmatic Kitty this fall.

The standard edition includes the film and soundtrack on a double format CD/DVD, a 40-page booklet, and a stereoscopic image reel for your View-Master, of course, and the limited edition puts the music on 180-gram vinyl and adds a 40-page comic book, Hooper Heroes, which you can also buy separately. No word yet on the release of any Sufjan-flavored bubblegum or commemorative roller skate key. The trailer for The BQE and an MP3 from the soundtrack are available below.

SONG LIST
01 Prelude on the Esplanade
02 Introductory Fanfare for the Hooper Heroes
03 Movement I—In the Countenance of Kings
04 Movement II—Sleeping Invader
05 Interlude I—Dream Sequence in Subi Circumnavigation
06 Movement III—Linear Tableau with Intersecting Surprise
07 Movement IV—Traffic Shock
08 Movement V—Self-Organizing Emergent Patterns
09 Interlude II—Subi Power Waltz
10 Interlude III—Invisible Accidents
11 Movement VI—Isorhythmic Night Dance with Interchanges
12 Movement VII (Finale)—The Emperor of Centrifuge
13 Postlude—Critical Mass

Sufjan Stevens

Movement VI: Isorhythmic Night Dance With Interchanges[MP3]
     

THE BQE- A Film By Sufjan Stevens from Asthmatic Kitty on Vimeo.

by Tyler Gould

16 Sep 2009


The music video for “Die Slow”, the frenetic dance number from Los Angelean noise rock outfit HEALTH, is engorged with gyrating bodies and spilling over with sticky blood, well-suited to the song’s sinister oscillations. The song can be found on their latest album, Get Color, which came out on Lovepump United just last week.

HEALTH “DIE SLOW” from Lovepump United on Vimeo.

by Timothy Gabriele

16 Sep 2009


There have been films made about William S. Burroughs before, but it looks like the revolutionary, experimental scribe may finally get a treatment worth watching all the way through. Interview subjects read like a mini Who’s Who of the interzone: John Waters, Genesis P-Orridge, Laurie Anderson, Peter Weller, David Cronenberg, Iggy Pop, Gus Van Sant, Sonic Youth, Anne Waldman, George Condo, Hal Willner, James Grauerholz, Amiri Baraka, Jello Biafra, V. Vale, David Ohle, Wayne Propst, Dr. William Ayers, Diane DiPrima, as well as close personal friends and associates. The only potential disappointment lies in the film’s apparent standard issue biopic interview format and linear narrative. A shame the filmmakers couldn’t muster something more Burroughs-esque. Perhaps I’ll be proven wrong.

by Allison Taich

16 Sep 2009


What goes through your mind when having an alcoholic beverage? Apparently for Russia and Poland, alcohol, or more specifically vodka, is much more than a consciousness-numbing substance—it is a key to history, tradition, and cultural pride. Since the late 1970s, both countries have been at war over where vodka originated, who has the right to call their product “vodka”, whose version is the knock-off recipe, and who gets to claim the drink as their own. The battle for vodka credit has even made it to the International Trade Court on multiple occasions.

After decades of fighting, The Vice Guide to Travel sent correspondent Ivar Berglin on a mission to find out once and for all if vodka originated in Russia or Poland. The Wodka Wars, a 33 minute documentary streamed on VBS.tv, presents the argument from a variety of perspectives. Berglin’s participatory approach took everything from history, nationalism, culture, and beliefs into consideration. He included diverse opinions and views on the debate from around the world. After watching the film one may ponder if history sufficiently proves claims to vodkas origins, or if opinion and pride are proof enough.

by Eleanore Catolico

16 Sep 2009


Stop it Sindri! I keep getting lost in your dewy eyes. Sindri Mar Sigfusson, bandleader of the whimsical pop-folk group Seabear, has just announced North American tour dates in support of his solo project Sin Fang Bous. Alongside Múm, this tour is to promote Sin Fang Bous’s first record Clangour, off Morr Music. Clangour explores Sigfusson’s personal musical ambitions with a thoughtful quilt of eclecticism: layered instrumentation and electronic hooks, colorful yet subtle melodies, and swirling vocals that keep you in a trance. Such pop ingenuity has led many to make comparisons between Sin Fang Bous and other experimental acts like Animal Collective. What separates them is that Animal Collective thrives on a dissonant, jungle-riffic street sound. It almost feels like it’s coming from an alien city. Hailing from Reykjavík, Sin Fang Bous’s songs are homemade quaint morsels of vibrant aural color. Clangour is a controlled chaos that is kind to the ears. These “pocket symphonies” remind you just how precious, and maybe fragile, the man and his music really are. Look below for his video for “Advent and Ives”, a free download of “Catch the Light”, and click through the jump to see the tour dates.

Sin Fang Bous

Catch the Light[MP3]

     

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