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by Will Rivitz

17 Aug 2016


Vandoliers’ “Wildflower” is largely based in straightforward country music, a touch of shout-along folk-punk contouring its edges. Instrumentally, it’s a very complex song, horns trading off with strings and banjo under vocalist Joshua Fleming’s strained yell. Its instrumental complications and genre tropes fit its subject matter appropriately — it’s about the lost and broken, those from whom we’ve had to move on. It’s a dark song with a touch of brightness and hope, a tone kept consistent by the way it occasionally soars far above its gloomy guitar spine.

by Will Rivitz

17 Aug 2016


Beginners’ “Stereo”, as the title’s connotations might suggest, takes a few cues from the ‘80s. Big, watery snares are the most noticeable, with cheeky synths and schlocky strings adding to the effect. It’s very much a modern song, though — the arpeggiation, distorted bassline, and vocal chops are straight out of radio pop-house. It’s a laid-back tune as ready for blasting from a Camaro system as from Spotify, and that timelessness is a wonderful thing.

by Will Rivitz

17 Aug 2016


Photo: Henry Diltz

Paige Calico‘s “The Hard Way” is pristinely loopy Americana, a gorgeous arrangement warped just a touch by a layer of sand and dirt. Calico sings dreamily over lolling guitar and choral backdrop, a touch of chamber pop influencing the song’s hazy make. Given that it’s a song about the strength and enigmatic nature of love, its semi-lucid atmosphere fits it like a glove.

by PopMatters Staff

16 Aug 2016


Chris Ingalls: Judging from the deadened delivery, GAIKA is seemingly numbed by what’s happening to his city. The brutality and violence is palpable in the track, with music stabs and samples that seem to bring to life the unrest. Musically, it’s diverse yet danceable (although the starts and stops create the requisite drama). Yet another reason why, when looking for new voices in hip-hop, you need to cross the pond. [7/10]

by PopMatters Staff

16 Aug 2016


Photo: Suzy Poling

Chris Ingalls: Daveed Diggs has rightfully established himself as an eclectic powerhouse thanks to his Grammy- and Tony-winning performance in Hamilton, and returning to his experimental hip-hop outfit Clipping. is a reassuring sign that he’s not content resting on his laurels. From their upcoming album Splendor and Misery, “Baby Don’t Sleep” is full of restless sonic experiments like static, distortion and myriad sound effects, but it’s Diggs’ rapid-fire rhymes that tie the whole thing together. For anyone who thinks hip-hop is getting stale, listen to this refreshing revelation. [8/10]

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Virtual Reality and Storytelling: What Happens When Art and Technology Collide?

// Moving Pixels

"Virtual reality is changing the face of entertainment, and I can see a future when I will find myself inside VR listening to some psych-rock while meditating on an asteroid.

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