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by Brice Ezell

19 May 2015


Following their Grammy-nominated collaborative LP with Bobby Rush last year, Decisions, Laramie, Wyoming’s own Blinddog Smokin’ have readied their next studio outing, High Steppin’. Populated by funk grooves, rock shredding, and a healthy dose of New Orleans style, the LP showcases the well-practiced union of high-energy instrumentation with frontman Carl Gustafson’s vivid lyricism.

On “Bayou Lady”, Blinddog Smokin’ pull off a fine feat: making an eminently danceable tune that also gets you to think. Gustafson’s understanding of the ways in which people overlook their own damage to the environment is on point—and it helps that his point is made with such jubilant music.

by Brice Ezell

19 May 2015


Photo: Bloodshot staff, the Yawpers, and band members’ families

In describing their new signees the Yawpers, Bloodshot uses the term “shitstarters” to describe the Denver band. When you read the label’s reasons for taking the Yawpers on, the only thing you’ll wonder is why it took so long for this brilliant match to come together.

by Brice Ezell

18 May 2015


In 2013, Jobs, a biopic about the life of the late Apple CEO and co-founder Steve Jobs, was released to little fanfare. Starring Ashton Kutcher as the titular figure, the film received a mostly mixed response, from both critics and the higher-ups at Apple. Bill Fernandez, one of the early employees of Apple, called it “the biggest, flashiest piece of fan fiction that there’s been to date.”

Two years have passed since then, and clearly Jobs’ story is still compelling to many filmmakers, as director Danny Boyle (Trainspotting, Slumdog Millionare) and Aaron Sorkin (The West Wing and Academy Award-winning writer for The Social Network) have prepared their own spin on the life of Jobs. Their film, entitled Steve Jobs, is “set backstage at three iconic product launches” and concludes “in 1998 with the unveiling of the iMac”, according to Universal Films’ official statement.

by Brice Ezell

18 May 2015


“In general, I’m a nostalgic person,” singer/songwriter Josh Gilligan says in relation to his new record Steady On. However, he qualifies this by also suggesting, “I don’t think retrospective behavior is completely healthy.”

From its homey sleeve art to its gentle, acoustic guitar-led songwriting, Steady On is the kind of album one could mistake for a nostalgia-worshipping hipster who’s imbibed one kombucha too many. The songs he writes, however, paint a different picture: a picture of someone who has taken in and has a deep respect for old-fashioned songwriting. Steady On may be a nostalgic affair, but it’s not nauseatingly so; it’s the sound of how to look into the past without worshipping at its altar, all the while bringing in a new perspective.

by Evan Sawdey and Brice Ezell

18 May 2015


Face/Off (1997, dir. John Woo)

Theoretically, if a work of art is bad, one will view or listen to it only once and never return to it again; after all, if it is truly bad, why would one want to spend any additional time with it? Yet dozens of films fall under the umbrella of “so-bad-it’s-good”, where a film’s badness becomes the very reason why one enjoys it. From the terrible direction, performances, and editing of Tommy Wiseau’s The Room to the apocalyptic nonsense of Southland Tales, so-bad-it’s-good cinema offers moviegoers the chance to have fun at the expense of itself.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Counterbalance: Pink Floyd's 'Wish You Were Here'

// Sound Affects

"Come in here, dear boy, have a cigar. You're gonna go far, just like the 207th most acclaimed album of all time, Pink Floyd's Wish You Were Here.

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