Latest Blog Posts

by PopMatters Staff

11 Aug 2017


Chris Ingalls: Pure Comedy is a giant leap forward for Father John Misty, not just in terms of his already high “mystique” factor; it also shows his songwriting prowess growing by leaps and bounds. The piano-led compositions and analog studio techniques show a maturity that falls somewhere between Brian Wilson, Randy Newman and Harry Nilsson, all major-seventh orchestrations and heart-on-sleeve vocalizing. Indie rock isn’t supposed to be this sophisticated. Thank goodness Josh Tillman is here to break conventions. [9/10]

by PopMatters Staff

11 Aug 2017


Ian Rushbury: Khalid comes across like De La Soul’s nephew. “Young, Dumb and Broke” manages to be wryly funny and meaningful at the same time. Throw in a bit of teenage angst and you’ve got yourself a summertime smash—people are going to be singing the chorus in shopping malls all across the U.S of A, all the way to Christmas. The video is cute, too. [8/10]

by Sarah Zupko

11 Aug 2017


Photo: Demi Demitro (Bloodshot)

For their third record, Boy in a Well , Denver’s the Yawpers crafted a concept album set in France just after World War I about a young mother abandoning her newborn child. It’s an emotionally rich album full of plot that comes with an illustrated comic book illustrated by J.D. Wilkes of the Legendary Shack Shakers that details every twist in the story. Chock full of rocking blues, a bit of psychobilly, and garage rock underpinned with Americana aesthetics, Boy in a Well releasing August 18th via Bloodshot Records, is a huge step forward for the band.

by Jonathan Frahm

11 Aug 2017


Kids and Chemicals combine the cerebral workings of electronic soundscapes with an unbridled affection for anthemic rock ‘n’ roll on their latest LP, After Life.

Expanding from a sibling duo into a four piece electro-rock quintet over the years, the Springfield-based artists’ ambitious latest project is centered around the concept of a drug-addled lover who considers going to quite literal otherworldly lengths to see his partner again. Aurally, the album invokes a medley of influences ranging from gritty rock, to modern and retro electronic callbacks, and even an acoustic-centric pop strummer to top things off.

by PopMatters Staff

10 Aug 2017


Chris Ingalls: Are the internet trolls right? Is this about the Illuminati? It doesn’t really matter—this dense, sample-packed track provides the perfect vehicle for a Kendrick/Rihanna collaboration and shows that neither artist is interested in slowing down or becoming boring. The mid-track harmony break, the simmering tempo, and the combination of both of these unique voices make this a winning single. [9/10]

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