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Thursday, Feb 15, 2007
by PopMatters Staff

Two Minutes to Midnight  Black Belt—"Road Crew" from Two Minutes to Midnight on Novoton

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What if you kidnapped Pete Townshend, Iggy Pop and Otis Redding, put them in a small cabin, force fed them cheap beer and greasy food, and—under the supervision of Josh Homme—made them solve the great rock’n’roll riddle? You might come up with something similar to the diverse, yet straight-forward, soundscapes of Swedish power trio Black Belt—big fuzzy guitars, fat ass bass, rolling drums, dirty denim, sweet soul and tons of swagger. With one foot running the working class meanstreets of the ‘60s, the other foot placed firmly in the black soil of the south, Black Belt proove that it’s still possible to create a stir by rolling that old rock in yet another direction. With their largest production to date, the band both roars and crumbles, whispers and cuddles—although they never lose trace of the chorus-driven nerve that made them a name in the first place. From—"Fall on Me"—a PopMatters exclusive

Sure, From is a four-letter F-word. It suits the band just fine. No song is precious. Nothing aims for utter seriousness. And it’s not a bad thing to infuse some rawness into arty abstraction. In the fall of 2004, designer Roni Brunn launched From in Los Angeles, and the lineup has been fluid since. Brunn sings and writes all the music; production and performance duties are shared. From’s sound began with the unexpecedly fecund pairing of the Stone Roses and early Madonna. Ride, Oasis, Primal Scream, and, of course, the Beatles have also influenced both the feel and the song writing. The lyrics reflect Brunn’s multinational displacement, playful sobriety, and boy-crazy attachments: very specific yet simultaneously intutitive. Dustin O’Halloran—"Opus 63" from the Marie Antoinette soundtrack, and "Opus 23" from Piano Solos Vol. 2

Piano Solos Vol. 2 is the beautiful new instrumental work from Dustin O’ Halloran. Dustin recently attracted the attention of renowned music supervisor Brian Reitzell, who asked O’Halloran to assist in the score of Sofia Coppola’s epic historical drama, Marie Antoinette. Two of the compositions on this new release, as well as Opus 17 from Dustin’s first Piano Solos album, appear on the Marie Antoinette soundtrack.


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Thursday, Feb 15, 2007
by PopMatters Staff

Girl Talk - Mix One
Check out the band in concert at Be The RIOTTT (click on screen)



You can see the rest of the set here


Girl Talk - Mix Two
Check out the band in concert at Be The RIOTTT (click on screen)



You can see the rest of the set here


Girl Talk - Mix Three
Check out the band in concert at Be The RIOTTT (click on screen)



You can see the rest of the set here


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Wednesday, Feb 14, 2007
by PopMatters Staff
Placebo

Placebo


MedsVirgin Records is re-releasing Meds, the newest album by London-based alternative rock trio PLACEBO on January 23, 2007, the label announced. The album was originally released in the U.S. earlier in 2006 through the Astralwerks label.


The Virgin Records edition of Meds, described by the band as a back-to-basics project with the elemental feeling of a first album, will add three songs not on the Astralwerks release: “Lazarus,” “UNEEDMEMORETHANINEEDU,” and a cover of Kate Bush’s “Running Up That Hill.” R.E.M.‘s Michael Stipe duets on the track “Broken Promise” and Alison Mosshart of The Kills is a guest on the title track.


Along with the growing alternative radio coverage of title single, the band has racked up over 4 million streams of the songs posted in the PLACEBO MySpace.com page. “Running Up That Hill,” the trio’s cover of the Kate Bush mid-‘80s classic, has been recently featured on two U.S. television series, Bones and The O.C. - Virgin


Stream “Meds (She Wants Revenge Remix)”


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Tuesday, Feb 13, 2007
by PopMatters Staff

In honor of black history month, Fark TV investigates yet another African-American phenomenon poached by Whitey: rap music. By looking back at seminal Caucazoid hip-hop pioneers, we can learn to appreciate the evolution of this underestimated genre. [From superdeluxe.com]


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Tuesday, Feb 13, 2007
by PopMatters Staff

The music video “I Wish (In Search of the Missing Children)” by Vienna was produced by a group of young professionals whose aim is to reach out to people to help find Missing Children around the United States of America.


The song is about the sorrow of losing someone dear and a desperate longing to be with that person.  It’s a cry to be heard, to be given another chance to see and be with that person and the pledge that expresses undying love for the missing one. The song is based on a real-life experience of a mother who lost her little one at the most unexpected time.


The producers felt that the song “I Wish” plays a vital role in this music video in search of the missing children around the US.  The words and the music in this song speaks to its purpose.


The people behind this video production offered their sincere intentions, their God-given talents and their devoted time to come up with a music video that would hopefully help pave the way to finding “The Lost”. - MissingChildrenVideo.com


Watch the video here


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