Latest Blog Posts

by Jedd Beaudoin

11 Oct 2017


Photo: Shane Gardner

When song and band unite to excite our basic enthusiasm, it’s a great thing. Witness this new track from Sunbathers, “Honeysuk”. The infectious, new heights-reaching track lasts a mere four minutes but remains with us for much longer. It functions as both a dance floor anthem and a piece worthy of meditating on via its exploration of all things sexy. The accompanying video compliments the track’s subtle funkiness as well as its light sense of humor and appreciation of the carnal.

by Jonathan Frahm

11 Oct 2017


Photo: Aaron Proctor

Whereas many of his contemporaries are known for their more anthemic and bombastic evolutions of folk music, John Goraj settles into the pocket of the soft-spoken, emotive, and contemplative. The tracks spread throughout his upcoming EP, The Patience of Glaciers, are layered, roots-laden tunes reflective of the life their writer has lived.

by Jonathan Frahm

11 Oct 2017


ColinResponse‘s latest single, “Something About Your Love”, is an instant mood-changer. The Canadian soul artist’s buttery vocals are front and center on the track. It features an ebullient collection of musicians—including a rambunctious horn section—that helps bring it to life.

by PopMatters Staff

10 Oct 2017


Tristan Kneschke: At one point in “Continental Breakfast”, Courtney holds up a video of “Kurt and Courtney”, the chronicling of the relationship of lead singers Kurt Cobain and Courtney Love, two of rock’s greatest misfits. The synergy between Kurt Vile and Courtney Barnett is less fraught; it’s downright amicable. It’s not difficult to fall in love with both songwriters as they bounce around their domestic lives, interacting with babies, children, and elders alike, with smiles the whole way through. If you don’t find this video endearing, you probably don’t have a soul. [8/10]

by PopMatters Staff

10 Oct 2017


Photo: Ibra Ake

Adriane Pontecorvo: Rarely has isolation been so full-bodied in music as in Moses Sumney’s “Lonely World”, a song that gives melancholy voice to the poetry of alienation. It opens with lonesome guitar and slowly rising vocals before picking up fantastic momentum. From that point forward, a rush of increasingly frenzied beats back Sumney’s dizzying lyrics, and the sonic layers build and build to paint a full portrait, detailed with light and shadow, both intimate and vast. “Lonely World” has the scope of an epic, but a spirit laid totally, beautifully bare. [10/10]

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NYFF 2017: 'Mudbound'

// Notes from the Road

"Dee Rees’ churning and melodramatic epic follows two families in 1940s Mississippi, one black and one white, and the wars they fight abroad and at home.

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