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by Evan Sawdey

10 Aug 2012


When we previously looked at the new material coming out of Jonna Lee’s iamamiwhoami project, we found that her synth side project had evolved from experimental film whodunnit into something much more succinct, poppy, and remarkably catchy. “Goods” was the final track off of Kin, iamamiwhoami’s first official album, and it was funky, emotive, and really, really fun. We called it “The Most Inexplicable Song of the Summer Candidate You’re Ever Gonna Hear”, and even now, that statement still stands.

Yet diving deeper into Kin reveals just how well constructed and multifaceted this project is. After several listens, the whole thing begins to feel like the best Bjork album that Bjork never made: sonically daring without sacrificing song structure or emotive impact. The songs are very good and the corresponding film for the disc (feature wild choreographed numbers with a bunch of mop/Wookie creatures) is a miniature epic in its own right; but at the end of the day, there is one other track that stands out strongly from the rest.

by Cynthia Fuchs

10 Aug 2012


“The Jewish question still exists, it would be foolish to deny it.” So wrote Theodor Herzl in Der Judenstaat in 1895. His argument for a Jewish state opens the documentary, It Is No Dream: The Life of Theodor Herzl. Read by Christoph Waltz over images of current turmoil, marching skinheads and anti-Semitic graffiti, Herzl’s case here seems both prescient and never-ending. Opening 10 August at the Quad Cinema, Richard Trank’s film uses photos (augmented by the Ken Burns effect) and diary pages to illustrate the evolution of Herzl’s thinking, as well as his career as a playwright and essayist in Vienna. From his coverage of the Drefyus trial to his appeals to influential families (the Rothschilds) and heads of state, Herzl developed a plan for what would become Israel.

by Cynthia Fuchs

10 Aug 2012


“It started with the Army of Guardians patrolling the streets,” says Mitra Khalatbari, “constantly restricting, humiliating, and beating young people.” As she remembers the beginnings of resistance in her home country, the Iranian journalist is at once proud and sad. For as her memories bring her back to the elections of 2009 and the cruel oppressions that followed, Khalatbari, like other interviewees in The Green Wave (Irans gruner Sommer), is stunned by the betrayal and brutality of her government, the government that not so many years ago was born of resistance to another inhumane regime. Ali Samadi Ahadi’s remarkable documentary—opening in select theaters 10 August—underscores the horrific irony that the current Islamic Republic was born, in 1979, in response to the Shah’s abuses, and also makes clear the many contexts of the crisis, the history that made it possible and the lack of international that has allowed the crisis to persist.

by Evan Sawdey

9 Aug 2012


Insane Clown Posse have been getting, strangely, popular again.

Although the face-painted duo have never truly gone away, their mainstream profile has been increasing year after year. Whether it be Saturday Night Live parodying their overstuffed infomercials for their annual Gathering of the Juggalos, their inexplicable collaboration with Jack White, or, perhaps, their lyrics about quasi-spirituality (including a claim that “there’s magic everywhere in this bitch”) being endlessly ridiculed, the duo have managed to work their way into the national conversation now and then, although often in a wildly negative light.

by PopMatters Staff

9 Aug 2012


//Mixed media
//Blogs

'Doctor Who': Casting a Woman as the Doctor Offers Fresh Perspectives and a New Kind of Role Model

// Channel Surfing

"The BBC's announcement of Jodie Whittaker as the first female Doctor has sections of fandom up in arms. Why all the fuss?

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