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by PopMatters Staff

15 Jun 2011


This past Friday the former Smiths mainman, Morrissey, stopped by the BBC London studios to play three new tunes for Janice Long’s BBC Radio 2 program. The songs, “Action Is My Middle Name”, “The Kid’s a Looker” and “People Are the Same Everywhere”, will ostensibly appear on the artist’s forthcoming album for which their is no release date set yet. [via TheNJUnderground.com]

Morrissey - Action Is My Middle Name (BBC Session) by TheNJUnderground

by PopMatters Staff

14 Jun 2011


Germany’s Guano Apes have a long history, having formed back in 1994 and remaining active until 2006, when they broke up as guitarist Henning Rümenapp, bassist Stefan Ude and drummer Dennis Poschwatta all focused on new projects. All our now back in reunited form with vocalist Sandra Nasic after a highly successful return gig in Austria in June of 2009. The band’s 1997 debut, Proud Like a God hit gold and platinum status in various parts of the globe on the heels of hit single “Open Your Eyes”. Now in 2011, Guano Apes is back with their first set of new material since 2003’s Walking on a Thin Line. Bel Air hits North America this 21 June, following a #1 showing earlier this year in their home country, where it literally opened right at the top of the charts. Today we present the US online premiere of the group’s new tune “Sunday Lover” from Bel Air.

by William Carl Ferleman

14 Jun 2011


311 will tour this summer in the U.S., and plan to drop a new album, Universal Pulse, on the 19th of July. The band has released some sort of a video for the single “Sunset in July”. I’m guessing this one’s for the bona fide followers.


by Cynthia Fuchs

14 Jun 2011


In honor of the 40th anniversary of the release of the Pentagon Papers, POV streams The Most Dangerous Man in America 14 June.

Knowledge can be powerful, as noted by Daniel Ellsberg in Judith Ehrlich and Rick Goldsmith’s documentary. Remembering his first reading of the Pentagon Papers, he describes the stages of his response: “You feel great exhilaration as you’re getting all this amazing information that you didn’t even know existed,” he says, “And the next phase is you’ll feel like a fool for not having known that it existed, but that won’t last long. Very soon, you’ll come to believe that everyone else is foolish.” His decision to release the papers, of course, helped to change the course of the war in Vietnam. Now streaming on POV’s website, The Most Dangerous Man in America: Daniel Ellsberg and the Pentagon Papers tracks the complex process of his decision.

See PopMattersreview.

by Evan Sawdey

13 Jun 2011


[Video directed by J.C. Sciaccotta]

Colin Hay has had a remarkable career.  Actually, he’s had two of them.

The first one was as part of Men at Work, his merry group of Australian pop perfectionists who absolutely dominated the charts in the early 80s, winning a Grammy for Best New Artist while also conquering the charts with catchy hits like “Down Under” and “Who Can It Be Now?”  The band’s two subsequent albums failed to match the intense level of success that their first album Business as Usual achieved, and the group split shortly thereafter.

Colin Hay, however, was not a man to be idle for long, and in short time he was working on solo albums.  A prominent guest spot on the TV show Scrubs and a prominent placement on the soundtrack for the movie Garden State helped give Hay a whole second life to his career, and to this day he still tours and records.

Earlier in the year Hay released Gathering Mercury, one of the more emotional and subdued discs of his career, looking at his relationship with his father following his passing.  Prior to a show at Park West in Chicago, Hay sat down with PopMatters to discuss his new disc, the lawsuit over the flute line in “Down Under”, and so much more ...

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