Latest Blog Posts

by Comfort Clinton

29 Feb 2012


Kenneth Lonergan’s Margaret has lived in purgatory for six years. The film, which is written and directed by Lonergan, who’s past writing credits include Analyze This and Gangs of New York, and who’s last directing foray was 2000’s intimate and critically praised You Can Count on Me, a film that was nominated for an Oscar and won the Sundance Grand Jury Prize. After such an acclaimed directorial debut, hopes were high for Margaret, which was shot in 2005. The film stars a pre-Trueblood Anna Paquin, Mark Ruffalo, Matt Damon, and Matthew Broderick, and includes a brief, but scene-stealing appearance by Allison Janney. Even though filming took place six years ago, the film, produced by Fox Searchlight, has experienced massive delays in terms of actual release, and only hit screens in December of 2011 (the time lapse is most obvious in Matt Damon, who’s skinny appearance is more reminiscent of his Good Will Hunting days than his macho turn in the Bourne series).  It seems that the delays were due largely to Lonergan’s insistence that the film be screened at a run time lasting about three hours. Fox Searchlight countered by stipulating that it clock in at no more than 150 minutes, which is the current timing for the movie. Lonergan maintained that the extended edition of the film, which was edited by film legend Martin Scorsese himself, who reportedly referred to the extended film as “a masterpiece”, was the superlative version, and should therefore be shown to audiences.

by PopMatters Staff

29 Feb 2012


Earlier this year, PopMatters’ Robert Alford described Lost Lander’s latest record DRRT as “an album of honest and affecting songs that seamlessly combine elements of folk and pop with an innovative use of loop-based production techniques…. The instrumentation is inspired and gorgeous throughout.” That perfectly sums up the tune “Wonderful World”, which has new colorful, abstract video, which is designed to interact with DRRT‘s album art to create something of a mini art installation. DRRT is a small planetarium of sorts and you can watch this video on your iPhone, placing the phone inside the record’s artwork, which will then cast a light show on your ceiling when you flick the room’s lights off. Pretty clever.

by Cynthia Fuchs

29 Feb 2012


Shukree Hassan Tilghman wants to end Black History Month. He’s got his reasons, and most of them are familiar: for one thing, by “relegating” black history to one short month each year, it keeps American histories separate and unequal. For another, it generates a Black History commercial products industry that demeans the very history it means to celebrate. To track his quest, he’s made a film, More Than a Month. And now that film is screening on the last leap-yeared day of 2012’s Black History Month as part of
Maysles Cinema’s Doc Watchers series, followed by a Q&A with Tilghman and Anthony Riddle, Managing Director of the Maysles Institute and descendant of Dr. Carter Woodson, creator of Negro History Week. The film raises serious questions while offering a bit of antic framing, interviewing people with investments in history, then pondering how those investments have come to be. As the film seeks value in Black History Month, to understand the purposes it serves, it also finds value in ongoing debates over it.

See PopMattersreview.

by Cynthia Fuchs

28 Feb 2012


“The original title was ‘The Nigger Who Sat by the Door,’” remembers Sam Greenlee. “But when Dick Gregory brought out this book called Nigger, I figured he had taken the sting out of it.” And so the writer of The Spook Who Sat by the Door decided on a “much more subtle” title, as “spooks” refer to blacks, CIA agents, and “the armed revolution by black people [that] haunts white America, and has for centuries.” Greenlee’s memories are among the most vivid in Christine Acham and Clifford Ward’s documentary, Infiltrating Hollywood: The Rise and Fall of the Spook Who Sat by the Door, which premieres on the Documentary Channel on 28 February. As he and other participants—including actors J.A. Preston and David Lemieux, as well as editor Michael Kahn and Berlie Dixon, widow of director Ivan Dixon—it becomes clear not only how difficult it was to make the movie, but also how clever and committed they were to getting it made.

by Joseph Fisher

28 Feb 2012


The title of this short post pretty much says it all—except that the cover is gorgeous. If you’re looking for something that mixes up Slowdive’s original cut, this is not your cover.  Beach Fossils play things pretty straight here, performing “Alison” quite faithfully. There’s a little less flange throughout, and, certainly, Rachel Goswell’s gorgeous harmonizing is absent. Nevertheless, this cover is just as comforting as a freshly laundered blanket. Go ahead. Curl up in it.

  Beach Fossils: “Alison (Slowdive Cover)” by adhocfm
P.S. Check out the brief blurb on this cover at Stereogum to learn a bit more about The Ad Hoc Comp.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Players Lose Control in ‘Tales from the Borderlands’

// Moving Pixels

"This is an interactive story in which players don’t craft the characters, we just control them.

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