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by Jessy Krupa

6 Feb 2012


Arguably the biggest sporting event of the year (sorry, Olympics!), the Super Bowl telecast is usually the highest-rated program of the year. Last year’s mix of highly hyped commercials, a modern halftime act, and an interesting match-up of teams made Super Bowl XLV the most-watched show in TV history. Therefore, all eyes were on NBC last night for Super Bowl XLVI. Did this year’s show live up to the hype? Read on to find out.

Pre-Game

The festivities kicked off with a good, old-fashioned country duet of “America The Beautiful” sung by Miranda Lambert and Blake Shelton. The married couple gave the song proper respect.

by Comfort Clinton

3 Feb 2012


For football fans out there Super Bowl XLVI means mile-high kicks, cringe-inducing sprints toward the goal line, and game-changing interceptions. For the rest of us, it means commercials… and hopefully chili.

Known for it’s wide appeal and massive audience, the annual Superbowl broadcast tends to attract the cream of the product-hawking crop. It’s become so renowned that there’s almost an unspoken competition among companies to air the commercial everyone will be chatting about long after the stadium has emptied and the players have taken off their armor… er, padding. With 30 seconds of air time costing roughly $3.5 million, hopefully this year will not disappoint, and maybe it will even step up where last year left room for improvement- (insert joke about Kim Kardashian selling more than just Skechers here).

by Comfort Clinton

3 Feb 2012


http://thedomusic.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/the_do_both_ways_open_jaws_album_pakshot_lo.jpeg

The Dø (pronounced “doh”) is an indie folk/pop duet whose sound is as diverse as their members’ nationalities. The band is comprised of two members, Olivia Merilahti, who hails from Helsinki and Dan Levy, from Paris. The two collaborated to release their first studio-produced album, A Mouthful in 2008, which went on to top the French charts and earn rave reviews from critics. Their sophomore album, Both Ways Open Jaws dropped in 2011, and garnered much critical acclaim and audience attention. The Times even went so far as to call it “a late contender for album of the year”.

Citing influences that include Jimi Hendrix, Ella Fitzgerald, Eminem and The Wu Tang Clan, the Dø’s sound is incredibly varied. With elements ranging from classical to hip-hop, the Dø defy classification, as they prove with their cover of Janelle Monaé’s “Tightrope”, a song that once claimed the position of number eight on Rolling Stone’s Best Singles of 2010 list. While the original starts out fast and upbeat, the Dø cover builds to its climax slowly and, clocking in at just over nine minutes, includes an instrumental featuring sliding electric guitar and pulsating drumbeats. The vibe varies from blues to rock to a few things in between, and is tied together by Olivia Merilahti’s excellent wailing vocals, sure to become a fixture on the indie pop scene.

by John Bergstrom

3 Feb 2012


Back in 2004, the Washington, DC-based indie band Cartel generated a lot of buzz with the moody, Echo & the Bunnymen-esque “Fleets”. Then, they discovered a rock band from Georgia had dibs on the Cartel name. So, Cartel became the Cedars. They released an excellent EP, Another Season, in 2007. Rightly figuring that if such a strong, Coldplay-if-Coldplay-was-three-times-better effort wouldn’t get them a proper record deal, nothing would, they split.

Now, they are back, under the name Ms. Director, with a seven-track EP, Santo Domingo. The overall sound hasn’t changed much, and that’s a good thing. The guitars and keyboards are a bit more hazy, but the muscular rhythm section and Brian Leatherman’s beguiling voice hold it all down. Let’s hope the third name is the charm. Have a listen to Santo Domingo via Bandcamp, and download it there or from iTunes.

 

by Marisa Carroll

2 Feb 2012


A feather-light, engaging documentary, Love Etc. charts the evolutions of five romantic relationships in New York over the course of a year. Director Jill Andresevic selected a cross section of lovers from three boroughs (Manhattan, Brooklyn, and Queens) in various stages of their lives, all affable and all inclined to colorful self-expression. The film—which premieres on Oprah’s OWN Documentary Club on 2 February—features interviews shot in the subjects’ homes. As they discuss their pleasures and challenges. In other situations, they’re liable to perform a bit for the camera. They tell stories of ups and downs, though we don’t see anything too ugly or upsetting. With more than 500 hours of footage, it seems unlikely that none of it captured a difficult moment, so one can’t help wondering whether or why Andresevic chose not to include them.

See PopMattersreview.

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