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by David Amidon

10 Oct 2011


If anyone in the neo soul/future R&B scene is holding Prince’s ideals closest to their vest it’s Rahsaan Patterson, whose 2011 release Bleuphoria is an eclectic mix of organic digitalism and funky soul. In fact, one could easily argue it’s the most exciting release of his career, or at least the most fun, and it’s new single “Crazy (Baby)”, featuring a heavily-processed Faith Evans is further evidence of that. Eschewing the PPP-style gospel of lead single “Easier Said Than Done” and ‘80s-chic of “6AM”, “Crazy (Baby)” is a straight up party jam with a bounce that’s reminiscent of early ‘90s west coast hip-hop. The track is a little too late to be the summer jam it could have been, but definitely try to sneak it into your last barbecue’s playlist.

  Rahsaan Patterson - Crazy (Baby) by ThinkTank Digital

by Lee Dallas

10 Oct 2011


Adapted for the screen by Christopher Hampton from his own 2002 play The Talking Cure, David Cronenberg’s A Dangerous Method immerses the viewer in early 20th century Switzerland and Austria during a period of collaboration and conflict between two pioneers of modern psychology, Sigmund Freud (Viggo Mortensen) and Carl Jung (Michael Fassbender). As trailblazers in a hugely controversial field, Freud and Jung initially find in the other a brilliant ally: for Freud, Jung is a disciple who ensures that his work and legacy will continue after his death; for Jung, Freud serves as a father-figure who gives him the confidence to confront unexplored areas of intellectual inquiry.

But the arrival of Sabina Spielrein (Keira Knightley), a brilliant but acutely disturbed young Russian woman with her own ideas about psychology, arouses alarming new passions in Jung, which in turn lead to the dissolution of his happy working relationship with Freud. Their sexual and romantic pursuits inevitably disrupt their intellectual inquiries about the mind, heart and body, and before long all three thinkers are engaged in an explosive game of personal and ideological warfare.

by William Carl Ferleman

10 Oct 2011


Marilyn Manson gave a poetry reading in L.A., in support of The J. Paul Getty Trust. On 10 September, Manson read William Blake’s celebrated poem The Proverbs of Hell. The poem’s most popular line: “The road of excess leads to the palace of wisdom.” But the best part is Manson’s decision to have a drink of some strange orange liquid at the poem’s conclusion. Fitting.

by Andy Johnson

10 Oct 2011


Whenever I’ve had the chance I’ve enthused about Swedish songstress Gabi Frödén and hoped for a full-length album from her Foreign Slippers project. In April, that finally became a self-released reality with the arrival of Farewell to the Old Ghosts, her beautifully haunted folk-pop début. Although the LP partly comprises re-recorded versions of songs originally released on last year’s free It All Starts Now EP,  Frödén’s newer tunes are every bit as impressive. To celebrate its status as the title track of another new EP, the darkly soulful “Avalanche” has been given the video treatment courtesy of director Harry Amies.

Mixing augmented footage of Frödén with an unsettling story told through the time-honoured medium of puppetry, the film serves as a mystical new introduction to this under-appreciated London-based talent and is hopefully the signal of bigger things to come.

by Jessy Krupa

7 Oct 2011


Not only as a member of one of the most well-loved bands in music history, but also as a solo artist, John Lennon managed to release a lot of great of music during his tragically short career. Though we instantly identify him with such hits as “Help!”, “I Am the Walrus”, “Imagine”, “Instant Karma! (We All Shine On)”, and more, let’s look at seven of his lesser-known songs. Despite their lack of fame, these songs give us a window into the world of a truly talented man, who would have turned 71 years old this Sunday.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Here Comes the Bloom: Timothy Bloom Takes Hip-Hop to the Sock-Hop

// Sound Affects

"More sock-hop than hip-hop, soulster Timothy Bloom does a stunning '50s revamp on contemporary R&B.

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