Latest Blog Posts

by Matt Mazur

19 Jul 2011


Oscar Nominees:

Ellen Burstyn ... Resurrection
Goldie Hawn ... Private Benjamin
Mary Tyler Moore ... Ordinary People
Gena Rowlands ... Gloria
Sissy Spacek ... Coal Miner’s Daughter

Mazur Nominees:

Ellen Burstyn ... Resurrection

by Cynthia Fuchs

19 Jul 2011


Scout Finch appeals to everyone. Wise and immature, tomboyish and vulnerable, she’s recognizable even to people who didn’t grow up in segregated Alabama, who didn’t have a scary next-door neighbor and who didn’t have an awesome dad like Atticus. The continuing resonance of Scout’s story is the subject of Hey, Boo: Harper Lee & To Kill a Mockingbird. Released on 19 July on DVD from First Run Features, the documentary features a series of interviewees, many quite famous, who describe their sense of likeness and commitment to Scout (James McBride: “She sees the world through child’s eyes with an adult’s understanding,” Oprah Winfrey: “I fell in love with Scout, I wanted to be Scout. I thought I was Scout”). Harper Lee is less available. She retreated from public life soon after the famous film based on her only book was made. She remains rather perfectly the writer whose intentions aren’t performed, for an interviewer who’s asking or an audience who’s projecting. Even as people speculate, imagining both questions and answers for her. Her 99-year-old sister Alice, still a lawyer in the firm their father helped to found, explains Lee’s absence as a choice. “As time went on, she said that reporters began to take too many liberties with what she was saying, so she just wanted out… She felt like she gave enough.” Hey, Boo isn’t asking more of her. But it can’t quite leave her alone, either. 

See PopMattersreview.

by Matt Mazur

18 Jul 2011


Oscar Nominees:

Catherine Deneuve ... Indochine
Mary McDonnell ... Passion Fish
Michelle Pfeiffer ... Love Field
Susan Sarandon ... Lorenzo’s Oil
Emma Thompson ... Howard’s End

Mazur Nominees:

Sheila Florance … A Woman’s Tale

by Sarah Zupko

18 Jul 2011


On this day back in 1966, Bobby Fuller of the Bobby Fuller Four, known for his iconic tune “I Fought the Law”, was found dead in his car in LA at the young age of 23. Leaving this world so young like his idol and fellow Texan, Buddy Holly, Fuller’s death was declared a suicide, but rumors abound as to possible other causes. That aforementioned classic tune was later remade with a harder edge famously by the Clash.

by Imran Khan

18 Jul 2011


Blending electronic beats with some choppy Latin funk, Black Eskimo (a duo comprised of Ingrid Chavez and Marco Valentin) chart their course in some pop-friendly waters. Chavez, noted especially for her spoken word material, opts to ditch the talk and simply sing. Her voice, light and airy, hovers just above the grooves provided by multi-instrumentalist Valentin, who gives the beats some crunchy texture without cluttering up the soundscape unnecessarily. It’s really just a taster of what is to come, as Eskimo are due for a full-length release. But if a sweet and tangier brand of electro-pop is your dish, then this should go down nicely like a chilled lemon posset. Check out their debut single, “Escapology”.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

After Images: Poland's 41st Gdynia Film Festival

// Short Ends and Leader

"From painters to interrogators, some of the finest films at Gdynia Film Festival 2016 dramatized real-life figures from the country’s past.

READ the article