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by Crispin Kott

23 Jul 2010

Just when it seemed as though Insane Clown Posse couldn’t possibly top themselves, their “Miracles” video appears to have been nothing more than a trailer for the world’s greatest infomercial: The 11th Annual Gathering of the Juggalos has hit the internet by way of over 17 minutes of some of the most curiously constructed foul language this side of a David Mamet play.

The gathering, billed as something of a Wild West with Faygo free-for-all, takes place in mid-August in a place called Cave-in-Rock, Illinois, within spitting distance of Kentucky.

While a 17-minute ad might seem excessive, the lineup boasts so many Juggalo-friendly acts over a four day period, anything shorter clearly wouldn’t have been thorough enough. The roster also includes a handful of “Seriously?!?!?” moments, including Todd Bridges, Slick Rick, Ron Jeremy and ‘80s prop comic Gallagher, who even in his heyday struggled to engage his own audiences in what he clearly believed to be thought-provoking material (“Why do they call ‘em apartments when they’re stuck together?”) when all they really wanted was to see him smash watermelon with a sledgehammer.

There’s also flashlight wrestling, “comradery” and artist seminars, where presumably how magnets work will finally be explained. Suburban kids from Petaluma to Poughkeepsie are packing their makeup kits in rapt anticipation.

Somewhere beyond the grave, Billy Mays is wondering whether he couldn’t have done something to prevent this.

by Michael Underwood

23 Jul 2010

In this fourth episode of the LXD, we see the b-boy dance-fighting of the series actually cross over into real fight choreagraphy, with punches and kicks landing rather than fight-esque choreagraphy signifying combat. Existing LXD member Spex faces off against new ‘hire’ Tendo, and the two face off in the office once the civilians have left for the day. Also, papers magically fly in the fore- and back-ground. Because it’s cool.

by Bill Clifford

23 Jul 2010

Grace Potter & the Nocturnals have released their latest video for their eponymous fourth CD. Both, the song, “Paris (Ooh La La)” and the video are raunchy and not shy about inhibitions. It’s all sexual bravado here. You got me down on the floor, now whatch ya gonna do about it? While the song and the video are risqué, potter also displays a brash confidence of a woman comfortable with her own sexuality. This song aims to put Potter & the Nocturnals on the top of the charts. Consider it a victory for good music if our sons and daughters are listening to and watching this video instead of Miley Cyrus.

by Crispin Kott

23 Jul 2010

If you’re like me (and I know I am), you’ve wasted nearly a decade of your life hoping the Bees will swarm across the Atlantic and into the venue closest to your front door which has the ideal mixture of a quality sound system, an intimate-without-being-crowded floor and an ambiance worthy of a band who (through a cruel series of misfortunes which can only be taken personally at this point) have yet to play a gig in the United States.

The Bees (or A Band of Bees as they’re sometimes known) hail from the Isle of Wight, though three previous (and brilliant) albums have typified their open arms approach to melding musical styles from across the varied world spectrum. But their last full release, Octopus, dropped more than three years ago. When they followed that by pulling out of a Coachella appearance in 2008, it left their faithful wondering what the heck was on the horizon.

And now, it seems, our collective prayers have been answered, as the Bees are putting the finishing touches on their fourth album proper, Every Step’s a Yes. And because we’ve been such patient and good little boys and girls, the Bees have made available “Silver Line”, a charmingly pastoral song with a charmingly low-fi video. Worryingly for anyone hoping the album’s release is imminent, the song contains the line, “And I tell you that we won’t be rushed.”

But keep those chins up, Bees enthusiasts: Live shows are already underway, and perhaps those of us in the colonies will finally get the chance to dust off our best “Chicken Payback” moves in a live setting.

by Matt Mazur

22 Jul 2010

First Film: Bush Christmas (Henri Safan) and BMX Bandits, both 1983

Must-see: Eyes Wide Shut (Stanley Kubrick, 1999); The Others (Alejandro Amenabar, 2001); Dogville (Lars von Trier, 2004)

Star Turn: To Die For (Gus Van sant, 1995), in which she played a weather girl hell bent on becoming famous.

Underrated: Noah Baumbach’s generally underrated 2007 film Margot at the Wedding is Kidman’s finest performance to date, playing a brittle, brutal best-selling author who believe she is the actual center of the universe, opposite Jennifer Jason Leigh as her titular sister. Fearless work.

Upcoming, Current and/or Recent: Next year, she will star in HBO’s Hemmingway & Gellhorn for Phillip Kaufman and down the road she will play a trans man in Lasse Halstrom’s drama The Danish Girl,  but this year she will topline John Cameron Mitchell’s adaptation of the Broadway smash Rabbit Hole. Most recently she was found singing to Daniel Day Lewis in the all-star Nine.

//Mixed media

Because Blood Is Drama: Considering Carnage in Video Games and Other Media

// Moving Pixels

"It's easy to dismiss blood and violence as salacious without considering why it is there, what its context is, and what it might communicate.

READ the article