Latest Blog Posts

by Christian John Wikane

9 Feb 2011


David Pilgrim believes in albums. “Being a child of the ‘70s, I’m married to the album format,” says the Barbados-born, Brooklyn-based singer-songwriter. “If I write ‘singles’ per se, it is by accident. I have always enjoyed the notion of an album as a series of suites, that transport you from one feeling to the next over the course of time, and this album is no different.” Pilgrim applies that sentiment to his forthcoming album, All Things Being Equal, a veritable passport of musical excursions.

Akin to his last solo album, Island Soul (2003), Pilgrim serves up an appealing blend of compositions that reflect his democratic approach to music-making. His sojourns between Barbados, Mali, Ghana, and Senegal over the past five years inform much of the material, as he draws from an eclectic palette that includes ska, R&B, reggae, Afrobeat, hip-hop, and pop. From the serene soundscapes on “Shallow Water” and “These Fragile Days” to the percussive mischief of “Baby Hot” to the rock-infused guitar solo in “Ride De Razor”, Pilgrim sates a variety of musical tastes across the album’s 13 tracks and two bonus remixes. (Listeners might recognize “Older”, “Never Go Home”, and “Belly” from Pilgrim’s work with the Soulfolk Experience on The Soulfolk Experience, Vol. 1 album.)

Some of New York City’s finest musicians join Pilgrim on All Things Being Equal, including V. Jeffrey Smith and Maritri Garrett (his collaborators from The Soulfolk Experience), Shelley Nicole (Shelley Nicole’s blaKbüshe), Jeff Jeudy (I Love Monsters), Ki Ki Hawkins (The Ki Ki Experience), Toni Blackman, Malesha Jessie, Sabrina Clery, Arin Maya, and DJPJ (Paul James). Written, arranged, and produced by David Pilgrim, All Things Being Equal will undoubtedly provide refuge for those seeking a mid-winter escape.

by Sarah Zupko

8 Feb 2011


This Berklee College of Music-trained singer-songwriter has had music in her bones from a very early age, showing a love of singing at the tender age of three whence upon she began recording her young vocalizations with a little hand-held tape recorder. That love never dimmed through the years and followed her through schooling at Berklee, stints opening for Arcade Fire and Broken Social Scene after her move to Brooklyn, and work on a number of film soundtrack compositions. She got her big break when Moby took notice of her work and invited her to work with him on his 2009 album, Wait For Me.

Now just this past year, Scarr has released her solo debut, Piece, a superb album that we lavished praise on back in November with an 8 rating. PopMatters’ Matt James raved, “Piece is a beautiful record. A mesmerising, bewitching début. Amongst its ten tales, there’s nary a dud in sight. It feels timeless, out of time, and could’ve been born in 2010 or 1910. It’ll leave an ache in your heart, for sure. It’s as sad as friendly faces frozen for eternity inside cracked picture frames or once cherished toys gathering dust in the attic. It’s authentic Americana with a whole lotta soul. Scarr’s is a smouldering smoky voice backed by vibrant, elegant playing and enough trinkets and sparkle to fill Aladdin’s Cave. Like the best stories, Piece is one you’ll want to hear over. Don’t let it go unheard.”

Today, we have the pleasure of premiering Scarr’s newest Matthew Nourse-directed video for the tune “Break Up”, a highlight of Piece among many such highlights.

by Eric Allen Been

8 Feb 2011


The upcoming album release schedule just got a lot more appealing. On Monday, art-rockers TV on the Radio announced that their hiatus is officially over and they will be releasing a new LP this spring entitled Nine Types of Light. Specific details about the Dear Science follow-up are currently scarce, but the band is planning to hit the road to support the album. On April 13, they’ll kick off the tour at New York City’s Radio City Music Hall. Tickets go on sale Friday, February 18. Additional tour dates will be announced soon.

by Cynthia Fuchs

8 Feb 2011


New means of transmitting “news”, of making resistance and protest visible via Twitter, email, and cell phone footage—have been highlighted during the ongoing crisis in Egypt. And yet, if boundaries of identity and community are not in fact national or even state-secured or supported, then no one seems quite accountable for or even very careful about transgressing. Frontline: Digital Nation shows how advancing technologies not only bring faster and changed ways of processing, communicating, and conjuring ideas, but also produce gaps in experience and expectations.

See PopMattersreview.

by Jessy Krupa

7 Feb 2011


Possibly more entertaining than anything the NFL can come up with, this year’s crop of commercials featured everything from a helpful beaver to Justin Bieber. Despite their variety, most of the spots fit into one out of a few categories. Here’s the best of the groups.

Movie Trailers

Most of these movies are months away from hitting theatres, but that didn’t stop filmmakers from seeking future moviegoers. Animated parrot flick Rio and Steven Spielberg’s Super 8 stood out amongst early looks at movies including Kung Fu Panda 2, Captain America,Rango, Transformers: Dark Of The Moon, Thor, Mars Needs Moms, Pirates Of The Caribbean: On Stranger Tides, Fast Five, Battle: Los Angeles, and Limitless.

 

 
//Mixed media
//Blogs

Cage the Elephant Ignite Central Park with Kickoff for Summerstage Season

// Notes from the Road

"Cage the Elephant rocked two sold-out nights at Summerstage and return to NYC for a free show May 29th. Info on that and a preview of the full Summerstage schedule is here.

READ the article