Call for Feature Essays About Any Aspect of Popular Culture, Present or Past

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Friday, Apr 3, 2009

Cryptacize release their second album, Mythomania, on April 21st. The trio is Nedelle Torrisi, Chris Cohen of The Curtains/ex-Deerhoof, along with Michael Carreira. The spare, jagged rhythmic tunes nearly evoke a ‘60s girl pop band in a mid-‘80s post-punk setting and yet sound thoroughly contemporary and new.


Cryptacize
“Blue Tears” [MP3]
     


“One Block Wonders” [MP3]
     


“Mini-Mythomania (Edited by C Spencer Yeh)” [MP3]
     


“Tail & Mane” [MP3]
     



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Thursday, Apr 2, 2009

From Mike Newmark’s review here at PopMatters: “Graf opens auspiciously, with some quavering notes and a funky, propulsive beat, but it quickly becomes clear that St. Werner [of Mouse on Mars] doesn’t have melody in mind; soon, he’s treating the tuneful elements as he would a blast of noise or a floating piece of digital waste.”


Oh, well… sounds good to me, anyway.  Maybe the video helps.



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Thursday, Apr 2, 2009
by PopMatters Staff

The new video, “Down by the Fall Line”, from Arbouretum’s Song of the Pearl was directed by Joseph Cashiola and it’s a somber black and white affair that suits these recessionary times.



Tagged as: arbouretum
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Thursday, Apr 2, 2009

My brain just exploded. This is from the long-awaited debut album of LA producer Jason Chung (a.k.a. Nosaj Thing). It’ll itch your glitch and hip your hop. Prefuse 73 was great and edIT has his moments, but Nosaj Thing is what’s next. Keep your eyes peeled for Drift on June 9.


Nosaj Thing - “1685/Bach”


Here’s a taste of his first EP.


Nosaj Thing - “Hello Entire”


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Wednesday, Apr 1, 2009
The most quiently innovative music video director alive today scores ... again.

Will someone please stop Patrick Daughters, please?


This man has done nothing but wonders since he appeared on the scene back in 2004.  A friend of the Yeah Yeah Yeahs, this former film student was brought in to helm the clip for the second single off of the group’s 2003 debut Fever to Tell.  The song was “Maps” and the resulting video was as quietly devestating as you would expect for such a fragile number: Karen O, standing on stage during a rehearsal, baring her soul.  A simple concept that was executed grandly. 


Yet Daughters is very much a “concept” director: he knows that visual medium should be used to excite and entertain, which is perhaps why his overstuffed clip for Feist’s “Mushaboom” appears to have ideas for at least a dozen different videos wrapped up into it.  Never once are his videos boring: his style is akin to that of a young Spike Jonze, wherein a clever concept can carry an entire video instead of just being nothing more than a simple sight gag.  When not putting Beck in front of giant studio sets or putting Feist (again) in a field of fireworks, he’s orchestrating ... war ballets?


His clip for the Department of Eagles’ “No One Does it Like You” is both simple an haunting, as dancers take the form of soldiers and ghosts, lightly swaying and sashaying as death surrounds them.  The cutesy-aspect of this clip is cut short during its final moments, when the dancer-soldiers are shot with real guns, with real (fake) blood pouring out of them, both sides uniting in heaven.  The sharp violence immediately counterbalances the simplistic costumes (the ghost is a white sheet, for pete’s sake!), and—yes—the very well-choreographed dancing.  Yet the best part?  The visual element actually enhances the song’s emotional content.


So, let’s raise our drinks again to Patrick Daughters: the man to soon usurp Michel Gondry’s throne.


Department of Eagles - No One Does It Like You


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