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by Jessy Krupa

30 Mar 2011


The major networks brought us some October-related programming, but there were other big events in the TV world.

Halloween was well-represented on TV as ABC aired the classic It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown, while NBC went with the more modern Monsters Vs. Aliens: Mutant Pumpkins From Outer Space. Also adding to the spooky fun was ABC Family’s 13 Nights of Halloween specials.

 

by J.C. Sciaccotta

29 Mar 2011


Conceived as a gift for fans who pre-ordered the new Angles LP, the Strokes’ video for mellow album track “Call Me Back” features slow motion water droplets and a pretty girl. Need more be said?

by Eric Allen Been

29 Mar 2011


On April 4, the French electro duo Justice are dropping their new single “Civilization” on Ed Banger Records, and if you’re the type that likes to try it before you buy it, you can check out a high-quality stream of the song, via WATM Magazine, below.

  Justice - Civilization by WATM Magazine

by Zachary Williams

29 Mar 2011


According to Wikipedia, punk rock bands “created fast, hard-edged music, typically with short songs, stripped-down instrumentation, embracing a DIY (do it yourself) ethic”.

This sounds familiar to me. It sounds like the greatest band of all time circa 1963 knocking out their first masterpiece in a marathon single day session. The Beatles had more edge than the Sex Pistols, rocked harder than the Clash, and had a revolutionary attitude that would make Black Flag blush. Simply put, the Beatles embodied all of the major punk rock ideals a decade and a half prior to the invention of the genre. Paul McCartney’s “1, 2, 3, 4” was not only the count in to the first punk rock song, but also the count in to the greatest revolutionary force of the 20th century. Vladimir Lenin, Che Guevara, Mao Zedong eat your heart out.

Never mind the bollocks, here’s the Beatles…

by Matt Mazur

28 Mar 2011


The Museum of Modern Art presents a major retrospective of Charles Burnett, the American filmmaker who through three decades has chronicled the African American experience in over a dozen feature films and numerous shorts with actors including Danny Glover, Beau Bridges, Halle Berry, Lynn Redgrave, James Earl Jones, Ossie Davis, and Ruby Dee. “Charles Burnett: The Power to Endure”, running April 6 through 25, 2011, in The Roy and Niuta Titus Theaters, is a comprehensive overview of works including feature films, student shorts, and made-for-television movies all of which chronicle some aspect of the black experience in America.

Burnett, among the best under-recognized American filmmakers, has created films that deal with the particularly American problem of racism from its roots in slavery through the Civil Rights movement and beyond. Burnett will be present on April 6 through 8 to introduce his films, including the opening night screening of Killer of Sheep (1977), his first feature film, examining the Los Angeles ghetto of Watts in the mid-1970s. Charles Burnett is organized by Charles Silver, Curator, Department of Film, The Museum of Modern Art and Professor Robert Kapsis, Department of Sociology and Film Studies, Queens College (CUNY).

The films within this comprehensive retrospective include such noteworthy works as the dark comedy The Annihilation of Fish (1999); Namibia: The Struggle for Liberation (2007), the wide-screen epic chronicling the rise of the South West Africa People’s Organization (SWAPO) leader Sam Nujoma; The Glass Shield (1994), Burnett’s first studio-produced feature film; To Sleep with Anger (2007), an examination of the dynamics of families; and Selma, Lord, Selma (1999), a Disney television movie tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King and the Civil Rights movement.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Bad Graphics Are Still Impressive in ‘Spirits of Xanadu’

// Moving Pixels

"Spirits of Xanadu wrings emotion and style out of its low fidelity graphics.

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