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by PopMatters Staff

1 Jul 2010

Wavves’ new release King of the Beach had their digital release bumped up to today. You’ll have to wait until 3 August to pick up the CD. The band previews “Super Soaker” from the album in this video. You can hear the full live session on Sirius.

by PopMatters Staff

1 Jul 2010

The Books
The Way Out
(Temporary Residence)
Releasing: July 2010

The Books have jumped from Tomlab to Temporary Residence for their upcoming album. On their Tumblr page, they claim that placing the new record was frought with difficulties: “Finding a home for this record was a pain in the ass. Everyone I’ve played it for says it’s our best, most daring record yet, and still, all of the labels we admired that we thought would go for it wouldn’t touch it.” The band has given us an early taste with the MP3 of “Beautiful People”.

by John Garratt

1 Jul 2010

Earlier in June, saxophone legend Fred Anderson had suffered a heart attack and then fell into a coma in a Chicago hospital. He died soon afterwards, he was 81 years old.

The word “legend” gets overused all the time, especially by us music writers who happen to like jazz. It’s about as difficult to define as, say, “classic”. And although Anderson’s name will probably not reach household status like Charlie Parker’s anytime soon, it’s safe to say that modern jazz would have been very different had he never been born. Fred Anderson spent most of his life and career being a big fish in a big pond, lending a hand to his contemporaries (Joseph Jarman, the AACM) while schooling the newbies (Ken Vandermark, Nicole Mitchell, George Lewis, Hamid Drake). With such a far-reaching influence, Anderson has supplied us with a lifetime’s worth of hard-bop, avant-skronk, free-jazz disciples. His death may sadden us, but he already took measures to make sure we wouldn’t be empty without him.

My first and so far only visit to the Velvet Lounge, Anderson’s live music club in Chicago, was in early 2008. As I watched Dushun Mosley’s band tear through their second set of the night, my brother nudged me and said “that’s Fred Anderson taking door money over there.” He had arrived sometime after I had that evening, and his unassuming entrance apparently had done nothing to distract me. His stooped-over figure and slow steps definitely broadcast the fact that he was elderly. But did he set a nursing home schedule for himself towards the end of his life? No way. His 80th birthday was an all-out bash.

The Velvet Lounge’s website has numerous downloadable samples culled from a variety of albums Anderson had appeared on. Just bear in mind that each file is an edited snippet lasting a minute or two.

[Download samples]

by G. Christopher Williams

30 Jun 2010

Team Edward or Team Jacob?  Now you can decide for yourself with the interactive version of The Twilight Saga: Eclipse.

This “game” is brought to you by Beni and Rafi Fine with animation by the master of 8-bit farce, Doctor Octoroc (whose “Dr. Horrible’s Sing-Along Game” took YouTube by storm just a few short months ago). 

The gags are obvious, but, hey, the source material is just asking for it. Frankly, with the marketing of Twilight as an experience for the ladies that is all about choosing your kind of “man” to get interactive with (is your flavor of masculinity the sexy, but platonic delight of the undead or the growl inducing, uber-ripped beast man?), this only seems fair.

by Sean McCarthy

30 Jun 2010

Not much needs to be said for this one. The book series has sold 400 million. The movies have raked in more than five billion worldwide. If The Order of the Phoenix could be pared down to one book, chances are Deathly Hallows could have done fine with a three-hour run time. Lots of orchestration, lots of shots with Harry and Voldemort and lots of talk about the movie being part of a generation-defining event. Ladies and gentlemen, the likely box office champ of 2010.

//Mixed media

The Hills Are Alive, But Nobody Else Is in 'The Happiness of the Katakuris'

// Short Ends and Leader

"Happiness of the Katakuris is one of Takashi Miike's oddest movies, and that's saying something.

READ the article