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by Jane Jansen Seymour

8 Jun 2011

The new release from Hooray for Earth, True Loves, is out this week and has a link to listen to the entire collection of songs. Spin deemed the band one of their “5 Best New Artists for March” and is very complimentary in the accompanying write up. I had already picked the title track for my summer playlist with its fuzzed out bumps and grinding beat intro, so it was fun to preview the whole thing. This four-piece synth-pop band from Boston is now based in New York City, ready to take things to the next level. And just in case you’re wondering, the group is named for a line in the Nickelodeon cartoon Invader Zim. Streaming widget after the jump…

by Maria Schurr

8 Jun 2011

The Horrors
Releasing: 25 July (UK), 26 July (US)

If music critics love three things, those things are name-dropping obscure bands, abusing adjectives, and post-punk. When reformed UK Goths the Horrors released their Chameleons-esque second album, Primary Colours in 2009, music critics filled a thesaurus entry for the words “haunting” and “drony”, as well as sentence after hyperbolic sentence praising the album’s many hues and layers. From the sounds of new song “Still Life”, critics will be hitting up all over again come July 26, when third album Skying sees its release via XL. In the meantime, we can all enjoy the synths and, to an extent, Faris Badwan’s ever-improving singing voice with nary a descriptive in mind.

01 Changing the Rain
02 You Said
03 I Can See Through You
04 Endless Blue
05 Dive In
06 Still Life
07 Wild Eyed
08 Moving Further Away
09 Monica Gems
10 Oceans Burning

by PopMatters Staff

7 Jun 2011

PopMatters’ David Maine recently said of Afrobeat luminary Vieux Farka Touré‘s latest album, The Secret from Six Degrees Records: “At this point, Vieux Farka Touré is very much his own man as a musician and recording artist, which is an astonishing thing to say about someone whose career has been so short and whose father was so dominant in the field. It is exciting to wonder where his creativity and talent will take him next. Judging from this release, it could be anywhere.”

Not that he needs to because he’s spectacular on his own, but Touré paired with a number of big name US musicians on the new album, including Derek Trucks on “Aigna”, which you can sample from an earlier PopMatters premiere. His latest collaboration is the album’s new single “All The Same”, in which American jamband favorite Dave Matthews lends vocals to a haunting Touré melody. The scripted video of a lone boy lost in his imagination in a rustic forest was directed by Sam
 and is a Native Resonance production. Full credits appear after the jump.

by Timothy Gabriele

7 Jun 2011

YouTube user thenov29films has become something of the official unofficial videographer of much of the best underground electronic music coming out, most of which would never have a visual accompaniment anyway. The Nov 29 Films, filmmakers Kevin Paschold and Sebastian Kökow, thoughfully and precisely match clips of old art films, animations, video games, and whatever fits to modern music at lightning-fast speed, sometimes within days of a record’s release. Here is a week-old clip of a woman fluttering a fan to Venetian Snares’s “Ever Stopped the Heaviest” from their Cubist Reggae EP. Whereas Venetian Snares were at one time involved in the end of IDM that obfuscated beats, abstracted melodies, and skirted the fringes of listenability, their latest EP actually works in inverse by taking obscure elementals and ornamental production and highlighting the pop angles of such.

by Kate Dries

6 Jun 2011

The release of the trailer for Showrunners couldn’t come at a more perfect time—right on the heels of the trailer for Page One, about the media desk of The New York Times. Page One covers the now age-old battle between print and new media. Ignoring the fact that Page One seems an odd title for a movie largely about one desk (the title references the meeting had every morning at the Times to discuss the important stories of the day, featured on the hardcopy first page and homepage of the site), these films are not that different.

They follow people (white men, by the looks of the trailers) talking about the changing landscape of their given area in media. Arguably, Showrunners looks a little sexier than Page One; it interviews the writers and creators of our most popular television shows. And of the two, television is probably the more flourishing of mediums.

//Mixed media

Indie Horror Month 2016: 'Downfall' Explores Depression, Bulimia, and Suicide through Horror

// Moving Pixels

"Downfall finds horror in helpfulness.

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