Latest Blog Posts

by Jane Jansen Seymour

11 Jan 2012


In anticipation of the new release, Port of Morrow, The Shins have released a track “Simple Song” featuring an expanded sonic landscape and revamped line up. Although when frontman James Mercer’s vocals enter in, there’s no mistaking the musical foundation that has been dormant since 2007’s Wincing the Night Away. Midway through, things drop out to provide a playful interlude complete with choral harmonies behind Mercer’s crooning. He sings how it’s a simple song to say what you’ve done. The poetry continues with the lyrics, You feel like an ocean made warm by the sun.

Modest Mouse drummer Joe Plummer and Eric Johnson of the Fruit Bats appear on the song, along with “two former bandmates” according to the KEXP blog. Port of Morrow was recorded over the past year in Los Angeles and Portland, with Mercer securely at the helm, providing songwriting, vocals and most instruments throughout. A preorder is now available on iTunes, with an instant download of “Simple Song” and a B-side bonus track part of the package. As part of the newly announced Coachella line up, the band will also tour with additional dates in 2012. The touring band includes Yuuki Matthews of Crystal Skulls (bass), Jessica Dobson (guitar), Richard Swift (keyboards) and Joe Plummer (drums).

by Philip Majorins

11 Jan 2012


Dana Falconberry’s new EP Though I Didn’t Call It Came is quietly epic and ripe with wonder. This Austin based indie darling has been called on of the city’s “most promising singer-songwriters” and has starred in the documentary Echotone, a film focusing on the Austin music scene that has been awarded the a New York Times Critics’ Pick. The purity of her vocals and engaging presence make her live shows as captivating as a summer evening.

Though I Didn’t Call It Came was recorded in an old church and possesses the kind of space and calm reflection that perfectly accompany a morning cup of coffee or a late night afterglow. The rich orchestration and harmonies are just a taste to wet our appetite for a full-length release that was recorded during the same session and will be released later in 2012.

This track premiered as a stream earlier this week at MTV Hive and now as a free download here at PopMatters.

Download the track “Petoskey Stone” off of the new EP here:

by Cynthia Fuchs

10 Jan 2012


“I think he thinks, ‘Somewhere, I’m gonna get out of this.’” “He” is Billy the Kid, the legendary American criminal who is the subject of American Experience: Billy the Kid. Opening on a close-up of a noose hanging over a dusty (re-enacted) street, the show speculates repeatedly as to what the man born in New York City as William Henry McCarty might have been “thinking” at any given moment. He was “extremely intelligent,” says one expert. “Escaping was always on the agenda,” says another. Billy the Kid “came of age,” says narrator Michael Murphy, “at the moment the Wild West was forged, at a time when outlaws were made famous overnight in the pages of dime novels.” Because so little evidence remains (the only known tintype of Billy the Kid appear again and again here) and because much history is built on these fictions, it’s difficult now to piece together what did happen when. As Bill Richardson puts it, “He was made into a mythical character.” The show doesn’t question the myth so much as it presents it step by step, via historians and aficionados’’ testimonies, and , American Experience‘s familiar, richly mounted reenactments to fill in the gaps. Tight shots of boots and clinking spurs, shovels digging into dirt and rifles cocking, long shots of riders astride galloping horses and men shot dead, hitting the ground in slow motion. The imagined details can be evocative and even romantic (Billy is “blending into the darkness of the New Mexico night” or “framed by the moonlight”), as can the imagined motivations: he remained devoted to his girlfriend Paulita Maxwell, to the point of endangering his life. The natural and social environments were equally harsh, indicated by wind on the soundtrack and gavels banging. “The kid is a consistent rebel,” all the way,” say historian Paul Hutton. And such, he’s been absorbed into a national self-image.

Watch Billy the Kid preview on PBS. See more from American Experience.

by Jane Jansen Seymour

9 Jan 2012


The team behind movie We Bought a Zoo may be disappointed with their marketing decisions (another Dad in the dumps too close to The Descendants or maybe people just don’t want to see Matt Damon in that role?)  But they can’t blame Jónsi for not coming through with epic, heart-warming music for the soundtrack. A video for one of the two original tracks created for the score, “Gathering Stories”, is now out via some inventive animation by Crush Creative. It shows a fantastical world of colorful creatures in an Icelandic-like snowy landscape in similar hues to Jónsi’s homeland and stage design when PopMatters caught his show at Moogfest 2010. This song was actually written with director Cameron Crowe, perhaps a lyrical collaboration or decisions in the final production.

by Freeden Oeur

5 Jan 2012


When PopMatters last caught up with Jon Lindsay, the power pop aficionado was prepping the follow-up to his debut LP, Escape from Plaza-Midwood, one of 2010’s hidden gems. The Charlotte-based singer-songwriter worked at a breakneck pace this past year, putting finishing touches on his new album Summer Wilderness Program (which is set for a spring release) when he wasn’t on tour, and releasing a new album with his side project The Catch Fire. Lindsay also dropped a mostly holiday-themed EP, Could It Be Christmas?, on November 29. You can download “Partner”, a track off the EP, here.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Of Pillow Forts and Play: Epic Games' 'Fortnite'

// Moving Pixels

"Everybody loves building a fort.

READ the article