Latest Blog Posts

by Jane Jansen Seymour

5 Apr 2011

Lykke Li

This playlist sat empty before hearing the buzz bands of SXSW and a few key releases of fave groups (Moby, the Strokes, Radiohead). It began filling up so fast, I’ve already started another. This is a good omen for another great year of new music. The list includes many band members who have grown up together, either in the same family or as childhood friends, which can only reinforce the notion that it’s a good thing not to burn any bridges in your teens or otherwise. After the miserable winter in many parts of the country and heavy snows still pounding some areas, it’s time to celebrate spring with a bevy of new bands and new tunes of some veterans.

1. Smith Westerns/Weekend
I heard plenty about this young trio from Chicago before this song got stuck in my head. The band was formed by brothers Cullen Omori and Cameron Omori with Max Kakacek when they were still in high school. Now just a few years later, this single off their second release provides incredibly catchy psychedelic pop to the indie rock scene.

by PopMatters Staff

5 Apr 2011

The Tony-winning stage adaptation of the classic Green Day album, American Idiot is in its final weeks on the Broadway stage. You can still catch the show from April 5 - 24 with the Green Day frontman starring as St. Jimmy.

Pick up tickets for the remaining dates here.

About the show: The smash-hit, Tony Award®-winning American Idiot is Broadway’s most exciting new musical. The New York Times calls it, “thrilling and emotionally charged, as moving as anything on Broadway!” Based on Green Day’s Grammy® Award-winning multi-platinum album and featuring the smash hits “Boulevard of Broken Dreams”, “Holiday” and “21 Guns”, American Idiot is the story of three lifelong friends, forced to choose between their dreams and the safety of suburbia. Their search for meaning in a post 9-11 world leads them on the most exhilarating journey of the Broadway season.

by Matt Mazur

5 Apr 2011

When discussing female filmmakers, it is nearly impossible to not include Columbia University’s role in introducing new talent into the industry. The first woman to ever win a Best Director Oscar, Kathryn Bigelow for The Hurt Locker, is an alum, as are Lisa Cholodenko (The Kids are All Right), Nicole Holofcener (Please Give), Courtney Hunt (Frozen River), and Kimberly Pierce (Boys Don’t Cry).

This year, a new generation of women from Columbia will showcase their short films at the festival. Of note, and not to be missed, are Gina Atwater’s Crossing, Christina Choe’s I Am John Wayne, and Olivia Newman’s First Match. The subjects of these films eloquently range from a young female wrestler going to the mat for the first time, to an impoverished young man riding a horse through the streets to Coney Island, to a period piece about Southern racism.

by PopMatters Staff

5 Apr 2011

Foo Fighters’ latest album drops next week and, as is becoming habit, an early stream is available… this one via Soundcloud. The album is the band’s seventh and was produced by Butch Vig. Interestingly, the bulk of the tunes were recorded in Dave Grohl’s garage. Now how’s that for back to rock and roll basics.

  Wasting Light by Foo Fighters

by Evan Sawdey

5 Apr 2011

The title—Too Much Light Makes the Baby Go Blind—is kind of wacky.  The content, however, is downright unpredictable.

Greg Allen crafted “Neo-Futurism” after spending much time studying the Italian Futurists while at Oberlin College, eventually bringing Too Much Light to Chicago in December of 1988.  Since then, this show—wherein 30 plays are performed within one hour, the plays themselves changing on a weekly basis—has not only become the longest running show in Chicago, but has also spawned a branch out in New York as well.  Between his work with the Neos, Allen has also written and directed plays all around the country, often to great acclaim.

Here, in this exclusive interview with PopMatters, Allen sits down with us to discuss the Neo-Futurist aesthetic, responds to the charge that Too Much Light is “short attention span theatre”, and attempts to turn a table upside down with only the help of audience applause ...

//Mixed media

Indie Horror Month 2016: Executing 'The Deed'

// Moving Pixels

"It's just so easy to kill someone in a video game that it's surprising when a game makes murder difficult.

READ the article