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by Jennifer Cooke

23 Mar 2011


San Diego’s best kept secret, Apes of Wrath, just made it even harder for you to find them by changing their name to New Mexico. No matter. They still make the most exciting music in town that fails to penetrate outside of our humble borders. Who knows, maybe Wavves will start a revolution that starts everyone clamoring for all things San Diego: carne asada burritos, flip flops, and little trios like New Mexico. These guys seem to write a slew of new songs, each more kick-ass than the last, every single time they play a show. Don’t get excited about hearing “Epic Lover” because here comes “Case Closed”, and “Ramses”, from way back in 2007, is but a hazy, distant memory. And you thought Apple was bad with the planned obsolescence. Get it while you can:  here’s the new video for “Motion Sickness”.

by Cynthia Fuchs

23 Mar 2011


“The reason that they’re not going to jail is not that they didn’t commit crimes,” Charles Ferguson tells Nell Minow. “It’s because there’s been no effort to enforce the law, an even more disturbing phenomenon.”

This year’s Academy Award winner for Best Documentary, Inside Job traces the intertwined histories of deregulation, credit default swaps, subprime mortgages, and ideological Kool-Aid drinking. Interviewer and director Ferguson encourages his subjects to tell their stories. Some of these are convincing, others are cringeworthy, as lobbyists, bankers, and academics spin themselves into deep holes. It may be that Inside Job‘s greatest effect is that, as the interviewees reveal themselves, they become less central to the story. Increasingly, the film lays bare a culture based on greed and short-sightedness, one that produces a mindless focus on profits, whether ideological, political, or financial.

Part of Maysles Cinema’s “True Crime” series, the screening of Inside Job on 3/23 will be followed by an audience-led discussion with Gale and Ben Armstead, humanitarians, and long-time Harlem residents. On Friday, 3/25, the screening will be followed by a Q&A with Carl Dix.

See PopMattersreview.

by PopMatters Staff

23 Mar 2011


A lot has happened in the life of Nashville’s Bad Cop since we last caught up with them... The band has gone through a line-up changed, played the stages at PopMontreal and CMJ, as well as holding down a regular gig at Brooklyn’s Don Pedro. Bowing to the ironic resurgent popularity of the good old cassette tape and the return of the vinyl LP, vocalist Adam Anyone has also started a new cassette and vinyl label called Jeffery Drag Records. The garage rock band has a new 7-inch dropping this summer, but in the meantime they have just unleashed the new video directed by Seth Graves for “I’m in Lust With You”, an appropriate title for a testosterone-driven slab of charging guitar rawk.


As an extra treat, we’re giving you a preview of a new Bad Cop song to be released in finished form this summer. This is the demo version of “Wet Lips”.

by Cynthia Fuchs

23 Mar 2011


“I can’t say that I wanted to be like everyone else,” says Lyubov Meyerson, drawing on her cigarette. “That’s not quite how it was. I simply was like everyone else.” Meyerson’s is one of five Russian classmates’ stories in Robin Hessman’s terrific documentary, My Perestroika. Each recalls what it was like to be born into Soviet-era Communism, and now contemplates middle age in Russia’s new market economy. Through thoughtful and absorbing interviews, the film shows the perpetual disjunctions between official history and lived experiences.

My Perestroika opens in New York 23 March and Los Angeles 15 April. Many other cities will follow.

See PopMattersreview.

by PopMatters Staff

22 Mar 2011


Photo: Laura Ramsey

Canada’s Timber Timbre have been peddling their unique blend of noirish, cinematic roots music since 2005 and the band’s 2009 self-titled album was honored by being long listed for the prestigious Polaris Music Prize. This April the trio of Taylor Kirk, Mika Posen and Simon Trottier are offering up their fourth album, Creep On Creepin’ On, which continues to blend their influences from a wide variety of sounds. Kirk says, “The idea is to make music we love and therefore embrace the risk of sounding like all the music we’ve ever loved, all at once.” “Woman” is the record’s first single and the video is something of a 1920s-style, silent movie homage with flickering credits and camera movements and techniques reminiscent of early film. It’s an intriguing approach for a haunting song, the historic aesthetic making the song seem ever more poignant. The band will be touring the upcoming release and you can find the dates after the jump.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Exposition Dumps Don't Need Dialogue in 'Virginia'

// Moving Pixels

"Virginia manages to have an exposition dump without wordy exposition.

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