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by Evan Sawdey

26 Jan 2011

Today, we here at PopMatters are excited to bring you the first in what will be a lone line of video interviews, starting today with Tim Kasher, the Cursive frontman who we caught on the penultimate performance of his solo tour for The Game of Monogamy.

Backstage at Chicago’s historic Vic Theatre, Kasher was candid and open with us, discussing why he chose not to write two more Ugly Organ‘s, how he deals with the frustration of those who feel somewhat betrayed by his songs not being autobiographical, and—after coming clean with soem of his regrets—how getting to open for The Cure was one of the highlights of his life ...

by Chris Colgan

26 Jan 2011

When discussing Between the Buried and Me frontman Tommy Rogers, the topics most frequently discussed are his frenetic yet soulful keyboard skills, and the delightful contrast between his unearthly growls and gorgeous clean singing. However, not many people seem to realize just what an integral part of Between the Buried and Me’s songwriting and composition he is. Rogers is out to blow perceptions away, though, with his new solo album Pulse, issued under his given first and middle name of Thomas Giles. Arranging, composing, producing, and performing the entire album on his own, this dynamic and intelligent musician delivers a powerhouse album of progressive and experimental rock, enlivened by elements of techno and electronic included in the mix. The first single from the album, “Sleep Shake”, displays just how much effort went into Pulse, with shots of Rogers performing every single instrument and singing. With echoes of Trent Reznor permeating every second of his music, Thomas Giles Rogers is making his presence felt now more than ever before.

by PopMatters Staff

25 Jan 2011

Bob Marley & The Wailers
Live Forever: The Stanley Theatre, Pittsburgh, PA, September 23, 1980
(UMe/Tuff Gong)
Releasing: 1 February

Our friends over at MOG have a really sweet exclusive running right now. Bob Marley & The Wailers’ last ever concert occurred in Pittsburgh on 23 September 1980 and next week Universal is releasing the deluxe two-CD set documenting the historic show. If you sign up for a free 7-day MOG trial, you can listen to the album in full right now up until release. Of course, Marley performs all the old favorites too: “No Woman No Cry”, “Redemption Song”, “Jammin’, “Get Up Stand Up” and many more.

01 Greetings
02 Natural Mystic
03 Positive Vibration
04 Burnin’ & Lootin’
05 Them Belly Full
06 The Heathen
07 Running Away
08 Crazy Baldhead
09 War / No More Trouble
10 Zimbabwe
11 Zion Train
12 No Woman No Cry
13 Jamming
14 Exodus
15 Redemption Song
16 Coming in From The Cold
17 Could You Be Loved
18 Is This Love
19 Work
20 Get Up Stand Up

[Listen to Album]

by PopMatters Staff

25 Jan 2011

The Queen of Punk Cabaret has a new album out, Amanda Palmer Goes Down Under, as well as a brand new slick and glammy video for “Map of Tasmania”. You can catch that video below in its final form, but first check out this mini being-the-scenes featurette highlighting the making of the video. Decadent stuff, although one wishes the dude in the video had a bit more apparel on his bod.

by Jimmy Callaway

24 Jan 2011

In the decade it was on the air, Mystery Science Theater 3000 made piecemeal of almost two hundred really bad movies, the host and his two robot sidekicks adding an additional audio track of sarcastic commentary and other irreverence. But another mainstay of the show was the bevy of short films that the crew riffed on. Not every episode featured a short, but the shorts remain popular enough today to have been collected more than once for the home video market.

The majority of these shorts were chosen from the slew of self-improvement films produced in America during the 1950s, ostensibly to be shown to junior high and high school students. These “mental hygiene” shorts stressed ideals like obedience, cleanliness, temperance and other traditional “family values” associated with middle America after World War II.

The schlock and awe of these shorts alone makes them ripe for the MST3K treatment, but one short in particular stands out. “A Date with Your Family”, produced in 1950, is an instructional film depicting exactly how to conduct oneself for a most pleasant evening meal. The social angst and oppression pulsates off the film in nearly palpable waves, assisted in no short order by the narration of Hugh Beaumont. Beaumont is, of course, most well known for his depiction as the wise head of the Cleaver clan on that staple of Americana TV, Leave It to Beaver. For this short’s purposes, the benign yet firm voice of this uber-paterfamilias brooks no backsass from any smart-alecks who may be looking to ruin their family’s charming dinner by having an opinion or an original idea.

Mike Nelson, Kevin Murphy (as Tom Servo), and Trace Beaulieu (as Crow T. Robot) send this short up with evident glee.  It is also interesting to note here that when this episode of MST3K first aired, it was the summer of 1994, the same year the Republican Party began its eventual take-over of the U.S. Congress with its “Contract with America”. This platform called for major cutbacks on welfare and other social reform and sought to return America to its original “family values”. These values were ridiculous enough in 1950, much more so in 1994.

But they do make for prime comedy material.

//Mixed media

Indie Horror Month 2016: Executing 'The Deed'

// Moving Pixels

"It's just so easy to kill someone in a video game that it's surprising when a game makes murder difficult.

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