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by Katharine Wray

24 Sep 2009


Nick Hornby releases his latest novel, Juliet, Naked, on September 29. The standard Hornby ingredients are there, with a reclusive one-hit-wonder (or in this case, a one-album-wonder) raising a son, looking for love, and listening to pop music. High Fidelity meets About a Boy? Probably not. Writing what you know is the first rule or writing, or so they say. No matter how many times Hornby writes about himself, or at least his perspective, the story is always satisfying, funny and touching. Here Hornby talks about the autobiographical elements in his new novel.

by PopMatters Staff

24 Sep 2009


The legendary UK post-punk band Gang of Four recently played the Jools Holland stage. The band sounds amazingly contemporary playing a 1979 tune, perhaps not surprising since so many bands today clearly had a secret stash of Gang of Four records growing up.

by PopMatters Staff

24 Sep 2009


Arctic Monkeys played “Cornerstone” off their latest album, Humbug last night on Craig Ferguson. Emily Tartanella praised the “gorgeous balladry of ‘Cornerstone’ that feels like pure brilliance.”

by Tyler Gould

23 Sep 2009


The new video for Octoberman‘s “Thirty Reasons”, from Fortresses begins naturally enough: a man with a guitar sits outside and sings a plea for somebody to come back home and settle down. His reasons are numerous—though we never hear the specifics—but ineffective, and the singer knows it: “But I know / the thirty reasons you / have to break away / and set out on your own”. Are pleading lover songs ever really about winning somebody back? Isn’t that sort of an outlandish expectation?

The natural vibe breaks when a woman comes on-screen with a bounce and a stolid two-step and a backing band appears with snaps and harmonies. The cracks and strains of frontman Marc Morrissette’s voice evoke an acute longing-for-longing’s-sake and it becomes clear: the song is an end in itself, a small bit of “peace of mind”.

by PopMatters Staff

23 Sep 2009


Conor Oberst, M. Ward, Jim James, and Mike Mogis, better known as Monsters of Folk, dropped by Conan O’Brien’s stage last night to play this track off their “supergroup” album ingeniously titled Monsters of Folk. Watch for the album review tomorrow on PopMatters.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Ten Great Criterion Titles: What to Watch and Why

// Short Ends and Leader

"As the Criterion Collection's ever-growing roster shows, there are simply too many great pictures out on home video to know what to do with.

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