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by Crispin Kott

3 Mar 2010

Despite a curriculum vitae packed to the edges with brilliant music, Prince’s recent legacy has been marred by his absolute need to control how he’s seen and heard on the internet.

The debate over how the wilderness of the web affects music isn’t exclusive to the diminutive soul genius from Minneapolis, though there are few artists who’d go as far as forcing fan sites to remove their high-heeled likeness.

Prince’s paranoia has repeatedly touched YouTube, beginning in 2007 when he threatened a lawsuit against the site for allowing the use of videos featuring his music. A year later, he raised the ire of Radiohead when he forced the removal of videos of his live Coachella performance of their song “Creep” from YouTube. The videos were reinstated in that case, though other have disappeared and reappeared in some bizarre cycle of friend versus purple foe.

But what’s getting lost in the ongoing battle between Prince and the fans who love him in spite of himself is just how incredible his music can be. Whether it’s video of him stealing the show at the Concert for George with a blistering solo during “While My Guitar Gently Weeps” in 2004 or shaking his ass at the Super Bowl in 2007, Prince has still got whatever it was that made the world fall under his spell 30 years ago. Whether anyone gets to witness any of that depends upon how quickly they get over to YouTube.

Witness a series of videos posted by a user called groovytv80. The sound quality is terrible, and the video a static black & white shot in a large, but dingy basement. It’s Prince and the Revolution rehearsing for a tour in support of Purple Rain, the album and film which cemented his reputation as a superstar. “When Doves Cry” is the obvious go-to video for the casual fan, though it’s on b-side “Erotic City” that Prince’s brilliance is most apparent, on guitar, on vocals, as a bandleader and composer. It drips with sex, no mean feat for something that looks like security footage from a shopping center in the ‘80s and sounds like your next door neighbor playing their stereo louder than you’d like.

Run over to YouTube and check it out before Prince realizes it’s there. Or wait a week, and maybe it’ll turn up again. Such is the circular relationship between Prince and YouTube.

by PopMatters Staff

3 Mar 2010

Are we looking at the British Lady Gaga? Nah, she doesn’t have as many outfits. She does have a great new record though…

by PopMatters Staff

2 Mar 2010

Born Ruffians
Say It
Releasing: 1 June

01 Oh Man
02 Retard Canard
03 Sole Brother
04 What To Say
05 The Ballad Of Moose Bruce
06 Higher & Higher
07 Come Back
08 Nova Leigh
09 Blood, The Sun & Water
10 At Home Now

“Sole Brother” [MP3]

by Crispin Kott

2 Mar 2010

I didn’t want to like him, and for a long time I didn’t, instantly changing the channel whenever I saw his mottled face shouting bleeped swear words and inexplicably calling someone a Muppet. But then I got into contemporary cooking shows and somewhere in that transition I finally sort of understood the appeal of Gordon Ramsay.

British celebrity chef Ramsay is the histrionic host of numerous food-themed shows both here and in his homeland. “Food-themed” is me being generous, because while there’s certainly food here and there, shows like The F-Word, Hell’s Kitchen and Kitchen Nightmares are really more about manipulation, wallowing in manufactured confrontation and Ramsay’s gargantuan ego.

by Alex Suskind

1 Mar 2010

For a limited time only, the Guardian is streaming the upcoming Gorillaz’ album, which will be released 8 March.

1 .Orchestral Intro (ft. Sinfonia ViVA)
2. Welcome to the World of the Plastic Beach (ft. Snoop Dogg and Hypnotic Brass Ensemble)
3. White Flag (ft. Kano, Bashy and the National Orchestra for Arabic Music)
4. Rhinestone Eyes
5. Stylo (ft. Bobby Womack and Mos Def)
6. Superfast Jellyfish (ft. Gruff Rhys and De La Soul)
7. Empire Ants (ft. Little Dragon)
8. Glitter Freeze (ft. Mark E. Smith)
9. Some Kind of Nature(ft. Lou Reed)
10. On Melancholy Hill
11. Broken
12. Sweepstakes (ft. Mos Def and Hypnotic Brass Ensemble)
13. Plastic Beach (ft. Mick Jones and Paul Simonon)
14. To Binge (ft. Little Dragon)
15. Cloud of Unknowing (ft. Bobby Womack and Sinfonia ViVA)
16. Pirate Jet

//Mixed media

The Hills Are Alive, But Nobody Else Is in 'The Happiness of the Katakuris'

// Short Ends and Leader

"Happiness of the Katakuris is one of Takashi Miike's oddest movies, and that's saying something.

READ the article