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by PopMatters Staff

26 Aug 2010


British headline grabbers and punky poppers the Libertines kicked off their official reunion last night in London, playing a gig at the HMV Forum. The 21-song set featured all the expected favorites and the band has upcoming appearances at the Leeds Festival and Reading Festival on deck.

by Steve Horowitz

26 Aug 2010


The 1967 pop ditty, “C’mon Down to My Boat”, evokes sweetness and light. Every Mother’s Son seemed like good guys who just wanted to free a hard working girl from the clutches of her fisherman father. But lately, I’ve been wondering. The line, “Soon I’m gonna have to get my knife and cut that rope”—what does it really mean. The daughter is not literally tied to the dock. That would be too kinky. The more logical allusion is that the familial obligations keep the girl tied down. Therefore, what is Every Mother’s Son really gonna do with that knife? Do the lyrics suggest an act of violence? Does the sugary pop confection hide a darker meaning, and the singer is going to stab and kill the father so he can elope with the daughter? That may be reading too much into the lyrics, but the Summer of Love from which this song emerged soon turned into a more brutal era. Perhaps the clues were there all along, in innocent music like this.

by PopMatters Staff

25 Aug 2010


The Lovetones’ Matthew Tow has been playing in Brian Jonestown Massacre since 2003, all the while keeping his own band chugging through five albums. That fifth release is Lost, dropping 28 September on Planting Seeds Records. The group’s 2009 record, Dimensions, garnered an 8 from PopMatters, with Sarah Moore talking about how the Aussie band “brings a down-under haze to psychedelic pop mindful of the 1960s.” Lost features nine new tunes, including the opener “City Meets the Stars”, that continues to display the Lovetones’ love of psychedelic jangle pop rooted in the ‘60s and influenced by the Byrds, the Beatles and the Moody Blues.

by Peta Jinnath Andersen

25 Aug 2010


Earlier this month, award-winning author Neil Gaiman contributed a short story, to Harper Perennial’s recent Fifty-Two Stories experiment, Neil Gaiman contributed a short story, The Truth Is a Cave in the Black Mountains. Last week, he read the story for the first time at Australia’s Sydney Opera House. Here are a few highlights, via The Sydney Morning Herald.

Note: Contains spoilers.

by PopMatters Staff

25 Aug 2010


Caleb Nichols, formerly of Oakland’s Port O’Brien has collaborated with Jameson Swanagon on and off for the past 15 years. It took Swanagon’s return to the Bay Area from Boston to solidify their musical partnership in Grand Lake. The band’s debut, Blood Sea Dream, came out this Tuesday. The band is planning a free, new supplemental release called Soft Lake, releasing soon, that will include more minimalistic takes on songs from Blood Sea Dream as well as few new tunes. “Louise (I Live in a Fantasy)” appears on the earlier album, but here we have the free download premiere of the new take on the tune that will soon appear on Soft Lake. The original is a rocking tune, while this new interpretation is pastoral and folky, a thorough re-working.

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