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by Diepiriye Kuku

23 Apr 2010


Twenty-ten’s Cop Out is chock full of age old western mythology told through the same bunch of modern consumerist stereotypical figures: the loud Negro side-kick, the estranged hard-working dad, the well-positioned step-father, the wife who still loves the guy…and his defeat of some random enemy that somehow proves his love for his daughter. How many times have we seen this movie? Ever notice how little agency women have in these films- just pawns. Indeed, this could describe far too many Hollywood blockbusters that I have seen over the past 30 years. So why all the rehashing?

In Cop Out, we see some of the classic stereotypes play out, and here’s why it’s important to speak about race, because it provides a frame to look at how all characters are rendered abstract for the sake of art. But is it really abstract? Not really. These are noticeably thin stereotypes around gender, class AND race, so to pick out any one characteristic would be disingenuous. For example, the caricature of ‘working class white guy’ into which Bruce Willis seems to fit neatly, is always a dumb brute of a dead-beat dad. Further, we’re asked to sympathize with the sacrifices he makes on the job, so we romanticize daddy’s absence. But the explosions and gun shots too often distract viewers from seeing how ridiculously men are portrayed on screen. For example, in this flick, why wasn’t Willis’ man enough to accept the damn money from the rich freak! Is his ego really so grand as to need to ‘give’ away his daughter with his last penny, even if it kills him? Obviously so, since that ego forms the plot of most of his flicks.

And why are we still so tied to gender-roles that few seem to question giving away a young maiden? How can she attain any independence in her conjugal relationship if she has no respect from her own folks!?! Isn’t this really why Alice chose Wonderland? Moreover, (and interestingly, both in the case of Alice as well as Willis’ daughter in this skin flick), this had nothing to do with daddy love. Neither men had the child’s welfare in mind, and the mom seemed to go where the money rules; here, just like in Taken and hoards of other movies, she is effectively Oedipus’ mother Jocasta, a wealthy queen unable to make any real decisions for herself, including the welfare of her own kids. Isn’t that a classic feminine stereotype? This had everything to do with a dick fight, and the women and children were the prizes. Seen 2012? Seen Taken? Seen so many of these flicks, it’s critical.

by Alex Suskind

23 Apr 2010


Hailing from Toronto, the Canadian rockers’ third studio album Make It Bleed combines hard-charging, catchy vocals with a grunge aesthetic. Distorted guitars and a steady backing beat showcase the album’s standout track, “Move On”. Check it out on Dearly Beloved’s MySpace.

SONG LIST
01 Acceptance Corporation
02 Move On
03 The Ride
04 Candy-Coated
05 When Slow Is The New Fast
06 Carnivale (Onze)
07 Dress It Up
08 Make It Bleed
09 Fire Escape
10 Who Knows?
11 The Butcher’s Dog
12 Unsee
13 Move On (Cookie Duster Remix)

by Jonathan Simrin

22 Apr 2010


To quote the official synopsis, “our inspired and gentle-natured dreamer is quickly taken in by a motley crew of junkyard dealers”. If that’s not enough to pique your interest, just watch the trailer for Micmacs, and you’ll quickly remember why anything Jeunet makes is worth watching. Perhaps best known for the amazing visuals of Amélie, Jeunet has delivered solid films, like Delicatessen and The City of Lost Children. Micmacs follows Bazil, whose bad string of luck with weapons leaves him orphaned and with a bullet lodged in his head. Having found a hodgepodge crew of characters living in a junkyard, Bazil sets out for revenge on the mega corporations who are responsible.

by Maria Schurr

22 Apr 2010


Those generous boys in Mystery Jets have offered us a taste of their forthcoming album, Serotonin,tentatively set for release in July. Head over to mysteryjets.com to listen to “Flash a Hungry Smile”, while viewing the front page photo, which appears to be a slightly disgusting literal interpretation of the song’s title. If “Flash a Hungry Smile” is any indication, Mystery Jets’ third release should see the band further honing the pop sensibilities showcased on previous release Twenty-One. Enlisting Chris Thomas, who has worked with everyone from Pulp to Paul McCartney, as producer should be further indication of this. On “Flash a Hungry Smile” at least, all the capable hands seem to be working in harmony, as even the whistling bit resists being overly cutesy.

by Jennifer Cooke

22 Apr 2010


This video clip is a nice little glimpse of one of the greatest voices in pop music, at home, with a piano, and no bells or whistles. Sometimes I forget that when you’re as good as Tracey Thorn, that’s really all you need. “Oh, the Divorces!” is the first single from Thorn’s upcoming album, Love and Its Opposite, due May 18th on Strange Feeling Records.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Hitchcock's 'Suspicion', 'I Confess' and 'The Wrong Man' Return in Blu-ray

// Short Ends and Leader

"These three films on DVD from Warner Archives showcase different facets of Alfred Hitchcock's brilliance.

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