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by Cole Waterman

28 Apr 2016


Genre blending is the modus operandi for multi-instrumentalist and producer Kyle Norton, based in Grand Rapids, Michigan. “I Feel Like I’m on Fire”, the lead track of his debut EP under new moniker Norty, is testament to that. With a electronic bedrock, it opens with an anachronistic jazz lounge bassline, piano notes, and brushed drums. The atmosphere is thick and swirls like curlicues of smoke as tempos shift, Norty’s relaxed vocals and hip hop beats join the sound collage.

by Eric Risch

28 Apr 2016


With Gothic repose, North Carolina singer/songwriter Jeremy Squires intones, “Sending arrows straight / Balance targets on my head / Solitary space / For you I would change”, on “Carry You”, the opening song from his latest album, Shadows.

by PopMatters Staff

27 Apr 2016


Photo: Joanna Chattman

Emmanuel Elone: There’s a lot to like about “Porch Light”, from it’s beautiful fingerpicking to the sweet fiddle sections. However, the best part, in my opinion, about the song are O’Donovan’s vocals, which are eerily reminiscent of Indigo Girls. At times, it can feel a bit sleepy, especially when the delicate instrumentation and O’Donovan’s melodic vocals combine, but “Porch Lights” is still a great country folk song at its core. [7/10]

by PopMatters Staff

27 Apr 2016


Pryor Stroud: The latest release from the Kills’ upcoming Ash & Ice LP, “Heart of a Dog” is a chugging roots-punk stomper that showcases Alison Mosshart’s charred, vindictive, and cyanide-laced vocal acuities. Lyrically, the song refashions the Stooges’ “I Wanna Be Your Dog” to highlight a female protagonist, a protagonist that, while re-gendered, still desires with an animalistic intensity: “I’m loyal / I’m loyal / I got the heart of a dog,” Mosshart belts, and you can imagine her crawling on all fours, frothing at the mouth, baring her teeth, just like Iggy’s anti-hero, but here there’s an even greater sense of unease. Once unchained, what is this dog capable of? [8/10]

by PopMatters Staff

27 Apr 2016


Pryor Stroud: Departing from her Joni Mitchell-influenced acoustic folk persona, Beth Orton adopts the synth-centric instrumentation and airy melodic sensibility of ‘80s pop on “1973”, and the result is something close to bliss: a coruscating, light-as-air, psychedelia-tinged nostalgia trip that updates Orton’s sound without compromising her immaculate storytelling prowess. “Swimming in your mind / Swimming in my mind / Swimming in my mind with electric sky,” she sings, offering a perfect lyric embodiment of the song as a whole—which to say, listening to “1973” is like performing a freestyle stroke through the divergent rivers of your memory and remembering, in effect, all the former lovers whose memories you used to swim through as well. [8/10]

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// Moving Pixels

"If I invade and murder you, it’s for your own good. I swear.

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