Latest Blog Posts

by Steve Horowitz

19 Jul 2010

The promo trailer for Gary Shteyngart’s new novel Super Sad True Love Story features an interesting cast that includes actor James Franco as well as literary notables Edmund White, Mary Gaitskill, Jeffrey Eugenides, and Jay McInerney. The Russian Jewish immigrant has the famous guest stars humorously point out Shteyngart’s failings and general ignorance. What it has to do with the book is never clear, but hey, he comes off a as a fun guy who just wants to win readers through his associations with others. This makes more sense than a book blurb these days, and is more fun to watch.

by PopMatters Staff

29 Jun 2010

by Alistair Dickinson

21 Jun 2010

Kazuo Ishiguro’s devastating novel Never Let Me Go is making its way to the big screen. The film adaptation stars the dead-on cast of Carey Mulligan and Keira Knightley, and comes with a script by The Beach/28 Days Later/Sunshine scribe Alex Garland. Check out the trailer for this warped coming-of-age tale below and—if you’ve read the book—try and decide how spoilery the “sometime after your third donation…” line might be to the uninitiated.

by Peta Jinnath Andersen

3 Jun 2010

Over the Memorial Day weekend, author Jennifer Belle hired 40 actresses to read her latest novel in New York hot spots—while laughing uproariously.

Wondering what the fuss is about? Here’s an excerpt from Belle’s latest, The 7 Year Bitch, courtesy of Riverhead Books and Penguin USA.

+ + +

As I walked along Waverly Place to meet my friend Joy for dinner, I saw a girl in her twenties leisurely crossing the street,and something about her brought that whole decade of my life back to me. I had never seen this girl before, but I knew her. I knew that what she was doing now was just getting through the years until she had children. She was planning, as she walked, what she was going to do that night to ward off loneliness. She wasn’t thinking of it that way, but that’s what she was doing.

by PopMatters Staff

28 May 2010

Emily St. John Mandel follows up her electric debut, Last Night in Montreal, with a spellbinding novel of international crime, false identities, the depths and limits of family ties, and the often confusing bonds of love. Taut with suspense, beautifully imagined, full of unexpected corners, desperate choices, betrayals and half truths with deadly consequences, The Singer’s Gun explores the dangerous territory between one’s moral compass and the heart’s desire.

//Mixed media

Because Blood Is Drama: Considering Carnage in Video Games and Other Media

// Moving Pixels

"It's easy to dismiss blood and violence as salacious without considering why it is there, what its context is, and what it might communicate.

READ the article