Latest Blog Posts

by G. Christopher Williams

13 May 2011


One half of the Digital Cowboys, Alex Shaw, took recent aim on his show at geek on geek snobbery. In a brief screed against what he perceives as divisions within the geek subculture, Shaw (with his usual passionate but still thoughtfully measured approach) considers the hypocrisy of how folks who feel alienated themselves sometimes all too easily judge others that feel the same sting of ostracism.

For those unfamiliar with the Cowboys, Alex Shaw and Tony Atkins produce a weekly podcast on video games that also sometimes touches on other aspects of geek-related culture.

If Shaw’s rant piques your interest, you can find more of he and co-host Atkins’s musings on video games and video game culture at The Digital Cowboys web site. They are well worth a listen.  Digging in with episodes like their one on death in video games or one on sex in video games would be a good place to start and should give a pretty good idea of what they are all about.  In my estimation, they present some smart, engaging stuff.

by Cynthia Fuchs

23 Mar 2011


“I can’t say that I wanted to be like everyone else,” says Lyubov Meyerson, drawing on her cigarette. “That’s not quite how it was. I simply was like everyone else.” Meyerson’s is one of five Russian classmates’ stories in Robin Hessman’s terrific documentary, My Perestroika. Each recalls what it was like to be born into Soviet-era Communism, and now contemplates middle age in Russia’s new market economy. Through thoughtful and absorbing interviews, the film shows the perpetual disjunctions between official history and lived experiences.

My Perestroika opens in New York 23 March and Los Angeles 15 April. Many other cities will follow.

See PopMattersreview.

by Jessy Krupa

31 Dec 2010


Now that the Christmas season has passed and the gifts have already been received, let’s take a nostalgic look at popular gifts through the years. The 1980s…

Cabbage Patch Dolls: It may be hard to imagine now, but these cloth-bodied dolls with plastic heads were the must-have toy of 1983. Fights broke out among crowds of angry Christmas shoppers who were looking for the nearly-sold out dolls.

by Jessy Krupa

30 Dec 2010


Now that the Christmas season has passed and the gifts have already been received, let’s take a nostalgic look at popular gifts through the years. The 1970s saw a boom in electronic technology, but many presents were still pretty old school.

Atari Pong: Before Xbox, Nintendo 64, or Sega Genesis: there was Pong. While you can probably play it on your cellphone today, it was a huge gift in the 1970s. In 1976, they sold for about $55.

 

by Jessy Krupa

29 Dec 2010


Now that the Christmas season has passed and the gifts have already been received, let’s take a nostalgic look at popular gifts through the years. The 1960’s saw the introduction of many gifts that are still popular today.

Milton Bradley Mystery Date Board Game: The original 1965 version costs over $100 online, but a 2005 version is more readily available. (I personally have the High School Musical version.)

 
//Mixed media
//Blogs

A Crooked and Unseen Highway: lowercase - "She Takes Me"

// Sound Affects

"The newest Between the Grooves series tackles Lowercase's Kill the Lights, a great marriage of slowcore and post-punk: raw, angry, sullen, and very much alive almost 20 years later.

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