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by PopMatters Staff

13 Nov 2013


SPONSOR: G-SHOCK is running a Europe-wide creative competition drawing from artists across the fields of music and visual arts to come up with exciting and innovative new designs for coveted G-SHOCK watches. As part of these G-SESSIONS, the creatives also were charged with designing the packaging for the watches and developing a special presentation for each proposed product.

by Craig Hayes

13 Nov 2013


Sisters Of… is a St Joseph, Missouri-based experi-metal and post-rock project founded by multi-instrumentalist Aaron Coker—who’s previously played in bands such as Appleseed Cast, and Reggie & The Full Effect. The band’s debut EP, Follow Me As a Ghost, traverses the field of primarily instrumental compositions, taking deep dives into dense vortexes, and drifting on the ethereal currents of more orchestrally inclined arrangements.

by PopMatters Staff

12 Nov 2013


Tagged as a “Bay Area psych pop supergroup”, Agony Aunts live up to that description with the richly melodic concoctions of their upcoming full-length, Big Cinnamon. Built on the foundation of the Corner Laughers lineup, with guest contributions from members of the Orange Peels and the Loud Family, among others, Big Cinnamon piles on layers and layers of swirling, shining harmonics. The result is an album chock full of compositions that are sunny and fun, but shaded with enough poignance to linger around a little while.

by PopMatters Staff

12 Nov 2013


For its fourth full-length, Model Rocket, the Brother Kite has crafted a bold, sculpted effort, driven by dramatic guitars and propulsive rhythms. While many a band this deep into a career would be tempted to (over)complicate its approach after accruing more and more experience, it’s refreshing to find a group like the Brother Kite streamlining what it does and channeling it into the muscular, straight-ahead alt-rock sound you hear on Model Rocket. Streaming exclusively here on PopMatters, Model Rocket is being released today on Clairecords.

by Cynthia Fuchs

5 Nov 2013


“Never believe you’ve played your last hand,” instructs Jean Marc Calvet. “Never believe it’s too late, never believe that things will never work out.” Under his voiceover, you see Calvet walking into the frame, in slow motion. His sunglasses obscure his eyes, his bald head and hoop earrings overwhelming as he fills the frame, obscuring the traffic behind him.

As an introduction to the French-Nicaraguan painter, these first few moments of Calvet suggest his intensity, his determination, his capacity for self-reflection, They are also the last moment in Dominic Allan’s movie that moves so slowly, literally. From here on out, the pace is propulsive, as Calvet takes you on a journey through his past, passing by his present, and into his possible future. And the camera does its best to keep up with him.

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