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by Jonathan Kosakow

29 Nov 2011


If the new single, “Lonely Boy”, is any indicator of what to expect from the Black Keys’ upcoming album El Camino, then you’d better be ready to add another disc to your rotation on December 6. And no, it’s not only because of the awesomely absurd video (below) they’ve put together for it (by “put together” I mean “pressed play”), which by itself is a feat of viral video genius.

“Lonely Boy” is perfectly Black Keys—a grungy, anthemic rock tune with hints of blues, psychedelia, and pop that is destined to be named one of the most memorable songs of the year. Granted, it’s cutting it close to the end of this year, but it would be a fault to leave this one off the Top lists of ‘11—if not for the music, then certainly for the video.

by Alan Ranta

28 Nov 2011


The Manchester roots of Golden Glow are on clear display with “The Cure”. Grainy, overexposed shots of the famous red brick city, birthplace of modern rave culture, are spliced among scenes of principal singer-songwriter Pierre Hall, alone in the studio. It is quite DIY looking, while the song itself was recorded on a four-track on a no-string budget, portraying the sort of detached delivery, loose play, and frozen drums one would expect to hear from Joy Division or the Happy Mondays, as produced by Martin Hannett. It’s all very Factory Records, very Manchester.

by Gem Wheeler

28 Nov 2011


The tunesmiths of Tin Pan Alley had an expression way back when: “the old grey whistle test”. If you played your song to the grey-clad doorman and he liked it, you had a hit on your hands. The people behind the long-running BBC music show of that name were proper musos—with all the baggage that entails—and the rather opaque title was exactly the kind of reference they’d appreciate. Whistle Test (or OGWT) may have disappeared from British screens in 1987 as a new wave of young pretenders took to the stage, but its lasting place in pop culture has been explored by a new BBC Radio 2 series. Each programme devotes a full hour to a year of the show’s history, featuring archive audio and new performances from relevant acts.

by Jane Jansen Seymour

28 Nov 2011


Noah Lennox of Panda Bear has recently released a four-LP version of Tomboy in a limited edition box set through Paw Tracks for $35. The expanded collection includes single mixes plus unreleased instrumentals, a cappella arrangements and a new song, “The Preakness”. There is also a 16-page art booklet with lyrics, a welcome addition anytime. All profits from the sale of this set will go to the American Cancer Society and is limited to 5000 copies worldwide. Listen to the enchanting a cappella treatment of “You Can Count on Me” below.

 

by PopMatters Staff

23 Nov 2011


Jonathan Coulton is on a major roll of late… his new album Artificial Heart just hit #1 on the BIllboard Heatseeker Chart, meanwhile folks like Suzanne Vega, John Roderick of the Long Winters, Sara Quin of Tegan and Sara and John Flansburgh of They Might Be Giants turned out to collaborate with Coulton on the record. Artificial Heart is his first full-length offering of new material since his lauded “Thing a Week” series from 2006 where he produced a new musical work each week for a year. Coulton’s latest single is the ultra catchy “Sticking It to Myself”, which features Phil Hernandez from the Elegant Too. Flansburgh, who produced the whole album, returns to film and direct this new video.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

'Knee Deep' Has a Great Setting That Ruins the Game

// Moving Pixels

"Knee Deep's elaborate stage isn't meant to convey a sense of spatial reality, it's really just a mechanism for cool scene transitions. And boy are they cool.

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